2016 Stanford Graduate School of Business Graduation Ceremony

2016 Stanford Graduate School of Business Graduation Ceremony


[MUSIC] [APPLAUSE]
>>Please be seated. Graduates, Mary Bara,
honored guests, Faculty, staff, family, and friends,
welcome to the 2016 graduation ceremony at Stanford University’s
Graduate School of Business.>>[APPLAUSE]>>What does your graduation signify? As you know, studying at the GSB means so much more than mastering
the concepts of management, it is as much about
personal transformation. As you sit before us eager
to receive your diplomas, I encourage you to think about
how you have changed And grown, during your time here. Your graduation today,
celebrates all that you have done and become, and
your readiness to have a dramatic and positive impact on the organizations
you will lead, manage or found and through those organizations,
the communities they serve. What you have accomplished at the GSP,
you have not accomplished alone. You’ve learned and received help,
guidance, mentorship and support from many quarters,
all of which are represented here, today. First, you’re sitting shoulder to shoulder with your classmates,
as you have throughout your time here. Think how much you’ve learned from
one another in squads, clubs, study trips small group dinners, talk, touchy feely, or
just in quiet conversation together. You forged bonds here that will
become lifelong friendships, which will nurture and
sustain you in the years ahead. Take a moment to show your
appreciation for one another.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sitting behind me on the stage is a group of faculty, who represent the more than 200 tenure line faculty and practitioners, who have
been your teachers, coaches, mentors, study trip companions, career advisers, and so much more. I would ask the faculty to stand so that your students can
express their appreciation.>>[APPLAUSE]>>And at various locations throughout the amphitheater, our staff from the MBA, MSX and PhD programs, without their tireless efforts on behalf of all of us, none of us would be celebrating today. I ask the staff to stand,
if they are not already standing. Wherever they are and be recognized.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>I have left the most important for last, each of you has been supported by family and friends, as you will be throughout your lives. They provided encouragement,
validation, love, and yes, in many cases,
financial support as well. While we will hand the diplomas to you,
you know that in parenthesis after your name, belong the names
of those who have nurtured you and supported you along the way. This is your opportunity to stand and
say thank you to your friends and family, who are here to celebrate
your accomplishments with you.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Our mission is different from that most business schools. Our focus is on transformation, we are privileged to be the most
selective business school in the world.>>[APPLAUSE].>>In making our selections, we try to
pick the highest potential young men and women, and
to provide them with an education that will enable them to go on to
live lives of impact and meaning. I hope that this has been
a transformative experience for you and that you have become infected
by the GSB’s lofty ambitions for you and that you will indeed
take this education, and your desire to have
an impact out with you. I recently returned from East Africa,
where I’d gone for the opening for our new seed center in Nairobi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>I love being in Africa, but one of the things it so
clearly reminds me of is how many people in the world
live in very dire circumstances. And let’s not kid ourselves that the
difference between where we sit today and people with exactly the same talents in the slums of Kibera is
entirely of our own making. Each of us has helped along the way and
has been a recipient of good fortune, whether by birth or
the assistance of others, with that comes a responsibility to make the most of
the opportunities that we have been given. It has become my custom to send you
off with three wishes that I have for you in your future. Here are my hopes for the class of 2016. First, do not be confused
about what really matters. It is the most important relationships
in your life, that give it meaning. Make sure that you nurture them. They will sustain you in
the good times and the bad. Second, be a lifelong learner. Life is a marathon, not a sprint. Life expectancy is going up, and you will
likely want to work for a very long time. So settle in for a long journey and
constantly invest in your self knowledge and capabilities,
both professional and personal, so that you’re increasingly well equipped for
the years that still lie ahead. Finally, let me note that at a recent 30th
GSB reunion, 82% of the class showed up. I want you to reflect on that for
a moment, 82%. So look around, make this group of people an important part of
your life for the rest of your life. Stay connected to one another and to us. Our graduation speaker today is an alumni, who embodies these values while
leading one of the largest and most important companies in the world,
General Motors. In 2015, she was ranked first on Fortune’s list of
the 50 most powerful women in business. And just this week,
she was named as number five on the Forbes list of the most
powerful women in the world. As well as number one on their list on their list of the most
powerful women in business>>[APPLAUSE]>>Mary Barra graduated from the Stanford GSB with an MBA in 1990. She was an Arjay Miller Scholar and
I’m so pleased that at age 100. Yes, folks. That’s 100, that Arjay is with
us today to recognize this year’s Arjay Miller Scholars. Please give a round of applause to Arjay.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Apart from her two years at the GSB, Mary has pretty much been all GM,
all the time. She started as a General Motors Institute
co-op student at the Pontiac Motor Division, earning
a BS in electrical engineering in 1985. After a variety of other roles, Mary was put in charge of global
product development In 2011. And so, we see the fruits of her vision
and leadership on the road everyday. We have gotten to know Mary and her
leadership very well in the last few years as we have worked together on
a transformational leadership program for senior executives, and
high potentials at General Motors. We take about 35 of these
incredible executives and put them together with GSB faculty
5 times a year at various locations around the world, culminating
in a group-based action project that addresses present strategic
issues facing the company. In this context, I’ve gotten to observe
Mary’s leadership style in person. She leads like a GSPer. She’s self-aware, inclusive,
open, direct and decisive. In short, she’s an iconic
exemplar of the goals we had for each of you in leadership labs. Despite the rigors of her role, Mary and
her husband, Tony make time for their community. As examples in 2014, they chaired
the Detroit International Wine Auction, raising a record $2.4 million for
scholarships and community arts programs. And in 2012, they chaired
the Barbara Ann Karmanos Center 30th Annual Dinner,
raising nearly $1.7 million for cancer research and
Mary Feinstein for Stanford too. I’m so proud to have her as a member of my
advisory council while at the same time, she serves on what we at the GSP like
to think of as Stanford’s other board, the Stanford University Board of Trustees. It is a pleasure to have
Mary with us today. Please join me in giving a warm
GSB welcome to Mary Barra.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Dean Saloner, Dean Emeritus Arajay Miller, members
of the Stanford Board of Trustees and the GSB advisory council,
distinguished faculty and administration. Honored guests, parents, family, friends. And most importantly,
members of the class of 2016. Thank you for
having me here this afternoon. I am truly honored to be a part
of your commencement ceremony. Dean Saloner as an alumna and a member of
the GSB Advisory Council, I want to thank you for your significant contributions
to this school and to General Motors.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>And to the graduates, let me say that
it seems like a lifetime ago.>>[LAUGH]
>>Well, that’s not going to work.>>[LAUGH]
>>It does seem like a lifetime ago when I
sat where you sit today. I recall very well, the promise and
the excitement of commencement and I am thrilled for each of you. So, congratulations.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Everything we know about the class of 2016 tells us that
you are one of the most accomplished and diverse classes in the school’s history. 42% of your class are women.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>And 23% are US minorities,
both all time highs.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>International students represent 44%, also a new high.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>In fact, members of your class represent
62 different countries and I got to spend some time with a few of
you yesterday at a breakfast meeting and I have to tell you, what I most
appreciated was the diversity of thought. As a class, you have previous experience
in more than 300 organizations. Everything from consulting and
private equity to manufacturing and the military, to government,
education and nonprofit organizations. There is no doubt that
you are well-prepared and well-positioned to fulfill the GSP’s
vision to change the world. Of course, the world has changed
considerably since I graduated. When I graduated in 1990, the Dow Jones
Industrial Average closed above 29,000 for the first time and we were all amazed
with something that was being introduced called the World Wide Web and there was no
such thing as a smart phone or texting. If you were an early adapter in 1990,
you had what was called a flip phone and you used it to actually make phone calls,
but not everything has changed
since I was a student. Just as it is today, Stanford was
still the finest school in the world with a faculty that was second to none. I know this, because many of you have studied with some
of the same professors who taught me. I’m very happy today to see
Professor George Foster who was my teacher for accounting.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>I’m also thrilled to see Professor James VanHorne who came
out of retirement last spring to teach Finance 211.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>And what I find most remarkable is that an updated textbook by the late Professor
Charles Hornbrook is still used today. My point is that you and
I learned from the best, the people who literally wrote the books and
now the e-books on business management. And so, it is no surprise to me that
you are extremely well-prepared for the road that stretches out before you. But as one who has traveled
some distance on that road, I can also tell you what you learn
here is just the beginning of what you’ll need to know for
success going forward. When I came to Stanford, I quickly
learned I didn’t know what I didn’t know. I was 26 years old. I’d lived my entire life
in Southeast Michigan and I worked for
General Motors since I was 18.>From accounting to corporate
culture to entrepreneurship, my eyes were opened and I learned to see
the world from a different perspective. My experiences on this campus changed
my life and accelerated my career. They prepared me to manage and
ultimately to lead. So allow me to share four leadership
lessons that I have learned since graduation. Lessons that have been important to me and
I hope will be of some value to you. First, leaders listen. You are graduating from one of the finest
business schools in the world. Be proud of that, but also be humble and know that any significant
accomplishment is always a team effort. It’s okay to admit when you don’t know. It’s okay to ask for help and it’s more than okay to listen
to the people you lead. In fact, it’s essential. Some years ago, I was asked to lead GM’s
Global Human Resources Function during a critical time for the company. I had never worked in HR before, but
I was confident I could make a difference. I accepted the position and
I immediately began to identify areas I believed that we could improve, and
help the company’s performance. Pretty quickly, I came to the conclusion
that the company’s vacation policy was too generous. I was troubled by a program that allowed
employees to take additional vacation days beyond what they had earned by
purchasing these additional days. So, I propose to my staff
to eliminate the program. They told me it was a bad idea. I argued that the program
had out lead to usefulness. No longer a place and are more leaner
more nimble, more competitive company. And so, I eliminated the program. The next day,
the employees nearly eliminated me.>>[LAUGH]
>>What I did not fully understand, because I did not listen to my
team was that employees purchase these days to give them flexibility
in their work and life. What’s more, employees often use
these times at fractions at a time, a few hours here and there. So they could attend to personal
matters like caring for an elderly parent or
attending a child’s sporting even, or attending a spouse’s
commencement ceremony. In the world of laptops and
smartphones and constant connectivity where employees
can and do work anytime, anywhere. The flexibility to purchase those
additional vacation days was viewed by many employees as an extremely
important benefit. Long story short,
Irene stated the policy very quickly and I learned I needed to listen much
more carefully in the future. I also learned, it’s very important to
surround yourself with people who will tell you when and why you’re wrong and
I learned that listening doesn’t diminish when you become
the general manager or CEO. Frankly, it increases. Lesson two, leaders care. I was a student here in the late
1980s where MBAs were frequently compared to Gordon Gekko, a character played by Michael Douglas
in the 1987 film Wall Street. Gordon Gekko’s mantra was simple,
greed is good. Today, the comparisons are more likely
to be with characters in the Wolf of Wall Street or the Big Short. But unfortunately, despite the fact that
business leaders have come a long way since the stereotype of Gordon Gekko, many people continue to view business
with a considerable disdain. Gallup’s latest update on confidence
in US Institutions from July of 15 reports that more than three-quarters
of US adults don’t trust big business. In fact, the only institution that ranked
lower than big business was Congress, but come on. That’s like saying, you’re the least ambitious
character in the Game of Thrones.>>[LAUGH]
>>As leaders in business, government, nonprofits, NGOs or
wherever your career takes you, you have a responsibility to
help change the relationship and the reputation institutions
have with society. Where do we start? For me at General Motors,
it starts with the customer. Now about two and a half years ago,
it was a Friday afternoon. I was just about ready to close my
laptop and slide it into my bag, and an email came in. It was from a customer. He was very upset. He wanted to get a loaner that the company
had promised and he was unable to get it. He was upset with his vehicle. He was upset with the company and
he was pretty darn upset with me, and he let me know it. So I stared at my computer for
a minute and then I responded and said, would you please share your phone number? A minute or two later,
I had his phone number. So, I picked up the phone and
I gave him a call. He explained to me what had happened. How the dealership had let him down and
how we weren’t fulfilling his promise. I promised him that I would
make sure he got a loaner and I immediately called the right people. And by the next morning,
he had the loaner vehicle we had promised. I felt good. I thought problem resolved. But on Monday morning,
I got another email. It was from the same customer and he said,
I couldn’t believe you responded. I couldn’t believe you cared. I couldn’t believe how well
the dealership and your team treated me. I have my loaner and I will now
be a General Motors customer for the reset of my life. The takeaway for me is that you and
your company will make mistakes. How you deal with those mistakes will
largely determine how you’ll be judged. And no matter what business you’re in, you only win when the customer tells you,
you win. Lesson three, leaders inspire. As I said, your company’s success depends
on how well you satisfy customers, but changing the world goes well
beyond serving customers. It’s also about serving society. When one day soon,
you will be leading an organization. You should absolutely be
concerned about the bottom line. In today’s world, you will certainly
be measured by quarterly results. But as a visionary leader, you should be
thinking more than just the next quarter. You should be thinking about the next
decade and what were your companies reputation and place in the world
be forty-quarters from now? More and more, today’s employees want
to be connected to a broader purpose, a higher calling. They want their companies and their institutions to make
the world a better place. I believe we can do both. I believe we are required to do both and I believe it’s up to leaders like you
to set the tone, create the vision, inspire the behaviors that allow
organizations to best serve society. As leaders, we have an obligation
to act responsibly and courageously for the people and for
the planet, because our actions do have long-term effects on
the generations that come after us. It means creating workplaces where
everyone is empowered and valued, and can contribute to his or
her full potential. It means working to improve
the communities where we live and work. For example by supporting and
improving STEM education. It means changing the way we build
our products, using renewable energy, creating landfill-free facilities,
and working to address climate change. And at GMs, it means working to reduce and one day eliminate the effect our
cars have on the environment. At the end of the day,
all businesses are about people first, because the only way we can genuinely
successfully build businesses, is by building lasting relationships
both inside and outside of the company. And at GM we do that by
holding our self accountable, doing what we say we’re going to do, and working hard to inspire others to strive
for something bigger than themselves. And my final lesson, leaders work. Your Stanford degree tells others
you have talent and that’s great. But if you truly want to change
the world you need more than talent. You also need to do the work. Because hard work beats talent
if talent doesn’t work hard. I think about my mom and dad. My parents grew up in
the Great Depression. My mom grew up on a farm
in Northern Michigan. My dad grew up in an iron
mining town in upper Minnesota. They didn’t have many advantages. They each only had high school degrees,
but they believed in the American dream. And they worked hard to achieve it. They taught my brother and me that there
is no substitute for hard work and you work before you play. And like so many other parents and
grandparents here today, they displayed the kind of passion and grit that allowed
them to not just raise a family, but to build a foundation from which
we could reach even higher. Your education will open doors. Your talents will open worlds. But your hard work will
enable you to accomplish more than you ever thought possible. So a lot has changed since
the years I sat in your chair, but the responsibilities of
leadership have stayed the same. Each of you are remarkably capable. You are highly trained and well schooled. And you are alive at an extraordinary
time in human history, where technology is changing our lives faster and
more profoundly than ever before. In this world of unbounded opportunity, all of you have the opportunity
to be successful. So my question to you is how
will you define success? Will you challenge the status quo? Will you inspire others
to do great things? Will you protect what needs protecting? And will you build a foundation that
allows future generations to reach even higher? In short, will you leave the world
better than you found it? I, along with so many others,
are counting on you. Again thank you so much. It’s been wonderful to be here and
share this celebration, and congratulations to the class of 2016.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Thank you, Mary. It is now my great honor to
introduce the GSP PhD class of 2016. The research undertaken by these
students is truly impressive, both in its quality and its importance. In aggregate, this research represents
over 100 person years of intense work. Let me briefly give some examples, showing the broad scope of issues
these students have addressed. The research of several of these
students involves studying networks. Among other things, this work explored
how politicians are held accountable by the structure of social networks, how
the strategic networks of venture capital firms affect the performance of
the companies that they fund. How the social network connections of
entrepreneurs affect the flow of ideas and the formation of teams. And how in general, economic decisions
are affected by social networks. Other students address the role that
privilege plays in maintaining inequality, and examine how conflicts in organizations
affect organizational learning. One student explored how
employment contracts can be designed to make sure the projects
aren’t inefficiently prolonged. Another studied the effects of
competition on supply chains, and another looked at how
the availability of collateral determines the funding
strategies of small firms. Several students in accounting looked at
how incentives and reputational concerns affect what gets disclosed by those
firms and when it gets disclosed. One accounting student examined how
the desires of security analysts to mimic their peers affect the quality
of their forecast. Finally, in the marketing area one student
studied how people respond to conflicting information given in product reviews
like those found on Amazon and Yelp. Another studied how the advertising of
e-cigarettes affects the demand for traditional cigarettes. And another explored how
the nearly constant interruptions consumers encounter in their daily lives,
affects decision making and attempts at consumer persuasion. All of this work is rigorously
done in accord with the highest academic standards, and all of it adds in important ways to our
understanding of management and policy. Today, we celebrate the transition
of these PhD candidates, from students to future
intellectual leaders. After their advisors place the hood of
the Stanford Business School on them, they will join us on the stage as we welcome
them into our profession as colleagues.>>Denille Burillo.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>Holka Brahma.>>[APPLAUSE]
[LAUGH] [APPLAUSE]>>Nick Eubank.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>William Floyd.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>Scott Ganz.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[LAUGH]>>[APPLAUSE].>>Johanna Higg.>>[APPLAUSE]>>James Cass.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>[LAUGH]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Rem Coning.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[LAUGH]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Daniella Cooper.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Demetrius Lewis.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[LAUGH]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Eric Matheson.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Shawn Malahi>>[APPLAUSE]>>[LAUGH]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Alex Nickelkov.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Juan Hi Heart.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Taylor Phillips.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Peter Shrum.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Aaron Snider.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>Remi Elizabeth Tome.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Ana Elizabeth Tuchman.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[LAUGH]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Reno Via.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Heto Sao.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Yao Fay Xiao.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>So congratulations graduates.>>[APPLAUSE]>>2016 marks the 44th class of students to graduate with a certificate
in Public Management and Social Innovation Founded by
Dean Emeritus Arjay Miller, the certificate program educates leaders
for environmental and social change. In addition to earning their MBA or
their MSX degrees, these students have taken a formal course
of study in the management of social venture organizations in both the private
sector and the public sector. Today’s certificate graduates
really do embrace the GSB motto. Changes lives, change organizations,
change the world. To give you some examples
of the program activities that they’ve been undergoing in the past
two years, consider the following. They participated in a wide range of
social renovation courses covering topics such as health care reform, education
reform and sustainable energy markets. They explored roles with high social
impact, such as social entrepreneurship, non-profit board governance and
philanthropy. They started and
operated the GSBs first ever impact investment fund which
will continue beyond this year. They traveled on social innovation study
trips to places in the developing world to see for themselves what is possible
to address issues of extreme poverty, inadequate healthcare,
inaccessible education, environmental sustainability and more. Some of these students, and
this may be the most impressive part, some of these students have already
developed their own social enterprise and are ready to launch after graduation. So there couldn’t be something more
different than Gordan Gecko in this class, in this certificate holder group. So this year we have 125 recipients of
the Certificate of Public Management and Social Innovation. Their names are listed in
the commencement program. I now ask those students to stand,
the 125 students, to please stand and be recognized by the audience.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Congratulations.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Good afternoon on this festive and beautiful day. It is my pleasure as director
of the Stanford MSX program to present this year’s graduate who
will receive the degree of Master of Science and Management. The mission of the MSX program is to
provide experienced leaders, men and women who have spent at least
eight years in professional and management roles,
the opportunity to prepare themselves for increasingly senior positions
in organizations they will lead. The program is a full-time,
year long, course of academic study. Giving these students an all to
rare chance for reflection and growth in the midst of
an already accomplished career. Simultaneously, they bring to
the GSBA perspective shaped by experience with difficult
organizational challenges, enriching our academic
community as a result. While studying at Stanford, these students
carry the title of Sloan Fellows, a tradition that dates to
the program’s Founding in 1957. This years Fellows came to Stanford
from across the United States and 25 additional countries. Many Fellows are sponsored
by their employers. Others will be joining or creating innovative new
enterprises after graduation. Having completed all the academic
requirements of the program, this year’s 91 Sloan Fellows will join the worldwide
family of Stanford Business School Alumni. On behalf of the administration of the
program, and the faculty who have taught them, join me in wishing each
of them great fulfillment and success in the next
phase of their careers.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>I will now read their names while
Dean Saloner presents the diplomas. Mushir Alambath,
>>[APPLAUSE]>>Ashlynn Alexander.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Guillermo Alvarez.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Louise Baker.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ananpala Subramanyan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Heron Peckart.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Alejandro Benitez.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Poleen Bermiche.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Diago Bonini.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Damas Brown.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Leo Gabral.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Enrique Gonzolves Decastro.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Carrie Sebul>>[APPLAUSE]>>Yuan Chen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yulan Chu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Cheung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Raphael Correia.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Kushenberry.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Bobo Donyloave.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ignasio Delvale.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gabriel Fundealer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Juan Pablo Freho.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dave Gabler.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Seta Basabourage.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julie Goul.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lynn Goul>>[APPLAUSE]>>Trance Hall.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Loreana Hanjiska.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kristen Marie Hedriksen..>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Travis Hollingsworth.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nick Horn.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jale Hwang.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sorab Ja.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Aaron Jones.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jiku Joseph.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christian Kaiser.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Uto Canon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nika Gidderelli.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Craig Klne.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Heidi Lee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Son Yung Lee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rebecca Huan Lynn.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Iban Lebouve.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ali Maaz.>>[APPLAUSE]
[APPLAUSE]>>Gustavo Mushado.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Francisco Matte.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anne Merritt>>[APPLAUSE]>>Claudio Ifano.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Christina Moon.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Daniel Camerotu Mota.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Steven Anthony Murray.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Zawad Nabulsi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Camarga Oleveda.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Mauritzio Ortiz>>[APPLAUSE]>>Song Pon>>[APPLAUSE]>>Bryan Kirby Phillips II.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>[APPLAUSE]>>Grenan Pinto.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Koquian Qua.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yong Chio.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eduardo Ribio>>[APPLAUSE].>>Ted Roosevelt.>>[APPLAUSE].>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gill Rosen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Omritanchu Roy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tina Sedege.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nori Segusa.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Maria Andrea Santichio.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Essau Agucci>>[APPLAUSE]>>Hugo Shima.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sarah Apa, Siriviri Yakun.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nick Smith.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Linda So.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Iro Aki Sonata.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>[APPLAUSE]>>Binu Sudaban.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Metu Tubalu.>>APPLAUSE]
>>Chee Howtan>>[APPLAUSE]>>Yua Fern Tan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jadib Kuman Tetterwal.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>[APPLAUSE]>>Peter Thompson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alexia Sotas.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Vulcan Turk.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rodrigo Vayra.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Onsu Yomiyay Wagner.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Wu Sang Wong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Den Den Woo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ed Woo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Xianu Yarav.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eamus Yoe.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sabrina Ebin Yeun.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Leo Zambalin.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Good afternoon everyone, distinguished guests, faculty, staff, families and friends. And I’m just throwing this out. Members of the Golden State Warriors.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[LAUGHTER]>>Okay, the MBA students gather before us today. Achieve great distinction. Two years ago when they
successfully navigated our complicated admissions process. Since then they have acquired solid
foundations in general management and have pursued further study
in their areas of interest. They have engaged in personal growth and built relationships that
will last a lifetime. They have helped the school and
the community in many very valuable ways. They are an impressive group,
and they are ready and worthy to join the ranks
of our illustrious alumni. Therefore, ladies and gentlemen, it is my great privilege to present to
you the Stanford MBA Class of 2016.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>You are the 91st MBA graduating class at the Stanford Graduate School
of Business, and in my somewhat biased opinion,
the best one yet.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>So as you leave to lead lives of impact and
meaning, I fully expect that your accomplishments at Stanford will pale in
comparison to your future achievements, but I hope your memories of
the GSB will remain fresh and that you will stay
involved with the school. Our alumni played an important
role in your academic experience, ranging from serving as judges
in the executive challenge to acting as mentors in your
entrepreneurial courses. It is my wish that you too will engage
with the GSB’s academic mission as alumni and give your time and your
experience generously to future classes. Your class has already demonstrated its
desire to stay connected to the GSB and to support the school in a meaningful
way through your participation in the Class Gift campaign. 95% of you have pledged
to give back to the GSB. Thank you.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>We know where the rest of you live.>>[LAUGH]
>>We’ll be coming after you, okay? You will leave your own legacy and play
a part in bringing the GSB experience to future generations,
as other alumni have done before you. At this time, I’d like to ask the members
of the Student Association Senate and the members of the seven
essay committees to stand.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Keep standing, keep standing. These are the elected
leaders of the student body. The essay has a profound impact on
the academic, extracurricular and social lives of students, and serves as
an important conduit between students, faculty and the staff. Serving on the essay is
a tremendous amount of work, most of which happens behind the scenes. And is the foundation for
much of the student experience. So please join me again in
a round of applause for this committed group of student leaders.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Thank you. Now, I would like to ask
the Arbuckle Leadership Fellows to stand.>>[APPLAUSE]>>The Arbuckle Leadership Fellows
program plays an integral role in the GSB leadership curriculum by bringing together
a group of talented second year students to support the leadership
development of the first year class. On behalf of the school, I thank these
69 students for their tireless work, their extraordinary dedication to their
[INAUDIBLE] squads and coachees, and for inspiring a significant number of first
year students to seek out this unique leadership opportunity. They are a role model for
student leadership at its best. Again, please join me in thanking this remarkable group of students.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Finally, I would like to ask the student
leaders of the study trips, the pre-MBA global seminars and
the Stanford Exchange Program to stand.>>[APPLAUSE]>>These 93 outstanding student leaders.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>[LAUGH] These 93 outstanding student leaders partnered with the school on
a critical component of the GSB education, the global experience requirement. They served as peer educators for close to 600 students traveling to
22 countries, helping them discover how business skills are relevant in a wide
variety of industries and institutions, and demonstrating once and for all that
different countries are different.>>[LAUGH]
>>For acting as ambassadors to the GSB and for their indelible impact on
the students they led, we thank them. Please join me again in a round of
applause for this successful group.>>[APPLAUSE]>>In the next few minutes we will begin
reading the names of the graduates in alphabetical order and we’ll invite
them forward to receive their diploma. Names will be read by Derrick Bolton,
the Assistant Dean for MBA admissions.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>And Margaret Hayes,
Assistant Dean of the MBA program.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Graduates will receive their diplomas from Dean Saloner. As Garth mentioned.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>As Garth mentioned, and as many of you already know,
RJ Miller is here today. I know that many of you consider
yourself friends of RJ Miller.>>[APPLAUSE]
[LAUGH] [APPLAUSE]>>RJ served in the US Air Force during the second World War, and was one of the whiz kids who
revolutionized Ford Motor Company. He became President of Ford and then later the much admired fourth
dean of the GSB from 1968 to 1978. In honor of Dean Miller’s service,
the top 10% of the class ranked by academic performance are designated
as RJ Miller scholars. As we read the names of the graduates,
we will also announce if they have achieved the distinction
of RJ Miller Scholar. The award comes with a special privilege. Dean Miller, whom as Garth mentioned,
turned 100 earlier this year, will personally congratulate
the RJ Miller Scholars, after they have received their
diploma from Dean Saloner. In the case of joint degree students who
are walking today but will not graduate, we will identify those who are currently
in the top 10% of the class. Okay, so with that, Margaret and
Derek, would you please begin?>>Susanne Adotto.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Havashash Adikari.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Wayva Aggarwal.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sultan Alsaud.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Laura Albero. [APPLAUSE]
>>Nathan John Alamone.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mohammed Haj Hassan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Talal Al Pamat.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Seyad Ozir Ali. [APPLAUSE]
[APPLAUSE]>>Ibrahim Alsuwaidi, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nefemi Alugir.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anisa Alusi.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Emily Raquel Ambrose.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ross Franz Andrese, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Panay Analethow.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Nicholas Richard Arambula.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Me’ama Argaman.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Line Arnoschotter.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Neil Aurora.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Marcos Asheshteron.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Burret Ire.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nan Bie.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrew Bakowski.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Sam Bannon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Steven Roderick Bardon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Parker Kyle Barnes.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Bryant Andrew Bar.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Freddy Bartholomew.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Shruti Baskarin.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kingsley McQueen Bier.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jim DeMorim.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jackie Bellow.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>William Franklin Burnett Junior.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Nicholas Michael Burrardo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Victoria Eve Barrenholes.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mario Berlanga Villarreal.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anthony Bertrand.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dorian Leo Bertsch, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Charles Bilger.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lindsey Claire Blodgett.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mi Bouquette.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Jeff Bowes.
>>[APPLAUSE]>>Elizabeth Boges.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daria Bolderiva.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ian Boneysteele, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Alissa Bonneau, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Marie Terez Boyle.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>William Brower.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julia Brown.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lila Grace Brown, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Constantine Robert Bueller, top 10% in current class.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel James Burrows.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kevin Burrows.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Caitlin Bussler.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Andy Lee Cahoy, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mathew Joseph Carmona.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joaquin Capeda.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dylan Scott Chambers.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Marco Chan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Monica Chau.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Helen Chen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anand Chabrock.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kudzi Chakumbu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Karna Chocshi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Victoria Maureen Chocshi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tyler Citek, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lucy Lyda Colesen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Peter Colas.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Maggie Connors.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Richard William Cosgrove, Junior.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christopher James Catrell.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alexandra Christa.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jed Cullen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Henry Curzon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nelson Nicholas D’Antonio II.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Fuad Daher.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Myles Walker Danielson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Colby Kent Davis.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alex de Simoni.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Raphael del Pino. [APPLAUSE]>>Goca Rash Dingra.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Selene Menshi Dy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>[APPLAUSE] Michael Chung. Ray Ding. R.J. Miller Scholar. [APPLAUSE]
>>Kelsey Elizabeth Ditto. [APPLAUSE]
>>Connor Donahue. [APPLAUSE]>>Julian G.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kate Earl.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ashley Elizabeth Edwards. Dennis Michael Ellis Jr., Jeffery Escadel. Sorry, sorry sorry.>>[APPLAUSE] [INAUDIBLE] [CROSSTALK]>>[LAUGH]>>Sorry.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Benjamin Ellison.>>[APPLAUSE]>>[INAUDIBLE]>>Hold on. [APPLAUSE]
[INAUDIBLE]>>[NOISE] Stanford.>>[SOUND]
>>[APPLAUSE].>>Okay. Derek [INAUDIBLE].>>[APPLAUSE].>>Misha Essepub. [APPLAUSE]
>>Okay, yep. Nina Abba Asundo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nina.>>Kenneth Ethinger.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Frederick Marshall Evans.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dominic Pattier.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Margarete Tang.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Marcela Hernandez Barrera.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Russel Field.>>Felipe Figereta Deandrade.>>[APPLAUSE]>>William Avery Fisher. [APPLAUSE]
>>Julian Fitzgibbin. [APPLAUSE]
>>Laura Galaton Franklin.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>William Frayer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sarah Fu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sean Michael Gehagan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Collin Patrick Gallster. [APPLAUSE]
>>Michelle Gatonya. [APPLAUSE]>>Stephanie Louise Gaffain, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catalan Alexandra Guerra. [APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Glassman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Marlo Paige Goldstein.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eduardo Gomez Mendoza.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Juan Manuel Gonzalez. Nikki Maria Golinez. Jonathon Greco.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Linda Gwo.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Johnathan Gerwitz.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kelley Susan Hackett, R.J. Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Jared Haftel.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christina Lanani Lynn Hagner.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gabriel Jaquim.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Samuel Halls.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Morgan Elizabeth Harkrow>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>Elizabeth Harnmayer.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Cassandra Hastey.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Cannon Micheal Healy.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Adina Hefitz.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Adam Hefez.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Matthew Hyman, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yanna Hennig.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Stefan Hildebrandt.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Allison Misara Hirata.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Amanda Catherine Holland.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kent William Holland.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Holub.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michelle Honturoo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christine Hong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Hopkins.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Matthew Horn [APPLAUSE]>>Brooks Hausfield.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brad Hungerman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael EK Chucu Ideki.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Cynthia Wing Yan Eep.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Irena Isekova.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kay Erastus.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rachel Simone Jackson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Garra Jane.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anweysha Jalan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Timothy Michael Jenkins.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Buena Ja.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lisa Cheung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Filipe Jimenez Polucio.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Greg Jordan, R.J. Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rich Joseph.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sean Matthew Jung. [APPLAUSE]
>>Natalie Scalia.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gozback Karduaman. [APPLAUSE]
>>Sarab Ram Rhaj Samrack Carsolio.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Annie Betty Kazataza.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Patrick Keating.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Leora Metzenbaum Kellman, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>James Glennan Kernaghan, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Somder Singh Cungeroot.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Claire Gobble Kylie.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Cobb, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Simran Coley.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jonathan Cola.>>[APPLAUSE] Evis Cong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gabrielle Jackson Kushachi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Robert Tudeas Kovolsky.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Jane Kramer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chin Quong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Apora Kukarny.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ken Wisan Kuran.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Carla Kirkchean.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Adrian Kwok.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Linda Whittaker Leder.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jackson Jan Chao Lai.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Emily Huntress-Lamont.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Wahlid.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kimberly Margaret Lobsher.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nadu Sophia Lawson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kun Lee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Song Pa Lee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Travis Lehman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nadine Ruth Leonor.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Amy Li.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tracy Li.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alina Lial.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Lebert.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Richie Brannie Lillie. [APPLAUSE]
>>Robby Lim.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brittany Lynn.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>James Pitchland Lindsey.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Spike Lipkin.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joe Leo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mae Liu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sarah Jane Lorber.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gilad Lorch, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nawal Jahed.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rachel Maddocks.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrew Madorski.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Prianka Madavia.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Katelyn Benet Meloy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Katelyn Marie Maloney.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Isabela Torres Maluthen, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chris Manse.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chloe Rachel Mark, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Peter Marler.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alexander Troy Martinian.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Laura Martino.>>[APPLAUSE].>>Vander Martins.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alice Martins Histolink.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Conrodo Marteret.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joanna Morieska.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eduardo Fernando Matthew Parades.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Suey Barret Machemelli.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Holly May.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nate Mizonson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lisa Mozaco.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Baron McGee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alison Anderson McKay.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alexander Neil McKinnon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jared Mick, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julia Velle Merra.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Shray Metta.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Fitzgerald Mester, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mario Mestrate.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jennifer Shang Rengmon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Melano Mondesido Hurons.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sharon Murad.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kristen Moritz, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Saki Moons.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Charles Marini.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jordan Francis Murray.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tafara Donald Mawandi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jesse Meyers.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>[INAUDIBLE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Eugene No.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nathan John Neparco.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Knoll.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Cate O’Gorman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kathleen O’Malley.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chika Okoro.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hiroeh Onishi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Juanica Onwikesee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tonsen Owemo Gunja.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Olayemi Albayourdi Foluyami Alagordei.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Myrmid Vigit Parek.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rajan Yavindra Patel.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>John Patrick.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Hall.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alexi Kazuka.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Benicia Spicora.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Desiree Pile.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jaime Ping.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Alejandro Perez Sanchez.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brady Joseph Matsky Perego.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alexander Pearson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christian Popestu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lea Poquerusse.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ariana Corsartif.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>John Foster Preston.>>[APPLAUSE]
[APPLAUSE]>>Clarence Qua.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nicole Quen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>George Ragab. [APPLAUSE]
>>D.J. Rogesacre.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Enmap Rumbawa.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sedi Rau.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Tyler Ral.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Marietta Krash, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anna Karla Raez Gonzalez.>>[APPLAUSE
>>Allison Shepherd Renderly, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Matthias Rivera.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Carolina Rivera Idonya.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Alejandro Rojas.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sam Rose, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Emma Rosen, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Raughcough.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Derrick Steven Raleigh.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Rucker.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Kevin Eschoke Restogi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sahed Saberal.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Laura Celay Gillahand.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>John Salsberg.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Brandon Anthony Sammut.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ofeer Sampson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Shelby Sanbie.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nicolas Sanguenetti.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Amy Carolyn Saper.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Akila Satich.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Cita Sorega.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Johnathan Tenety Shatts.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lauren Hoover Swartz.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Michael Bradley>>[APPLAUSE]>>Damien Scott>>[APPLAUSE]>>Jason Alexander Scott>>[APPLAUSE]>>Richard Cudalary Jr.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Ryan Sual.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Heral Shah.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Ricken Jayshaw.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jaqueline Mary Shannon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jacob Timothy Sheehan.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Christos Shepherd.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Maishen Shee, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Abe Willingham Shim.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Rusty Schlabb Shorigan, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eduardo Vasconcello Silva.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gideon Silverman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Samuel B Silverman.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Nicholas Reed Singer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Diana Sui.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Navley Scaff.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Cheng Yi So.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yani Su Jejus.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Alesandre Spitz.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Benjamin Cleon Springwater.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Felix Steinmeyer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Britney Ann Stitch.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Greg Stillman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Caroline May Stokes.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Samuel Fredric Stoutner.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Patrick Stringer, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Soren Benedict Sudoff, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jared Son.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>She-Yu Spendso Depo, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Morrits Schwagamachers.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lloyd Tonkum.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mischa Saint Teparia.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrea Taylor.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jonathan Bentley Taylor.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mi Yong.>>[APPLAUSE]
[APPLAUSE]>>Saran Alcazar Testhore.>>[APPLAUSE
>>Semetra Tarcore.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Thompson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Robert Thwates, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nahah Tribioala.>>[APPLAUSE
>>Alexia Tillman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anna Tomack.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ivan Tomick.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Allison Luan Milligan Tom.>>[APPLAUSE]>>JP Tosh, Top 10% in current class.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Fong Tran.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Fernando Trevino.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Harsarathi Trivedi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jason Too.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Emily Elizabeth Turko, R J Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrew Jacob Turner, R J Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Martine Ruthia.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Hamsa Usmani.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Marcita Varsenuala.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Pedro Enrique Deaiva Delanyellow.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brett Alexander Voit.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Botha Zombrano.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Aaron Sherrard Walker.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jason Ke Wong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Linkee Weng.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sarah Weng, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ronnie Lee Washington Jr.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Neil Paul Waterson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Colleen Kerrigan Wern.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Shumen Wee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Meagan Allison Wei.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Petra Weize, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yalek Wen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Stepanie Werner.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julie Wesel.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Reed Dorton Waldman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Arsani William.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Miral Wittevene.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alexander Ryan Wolf.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Rachael Wolfe.>>[APPLAUSE]>>David Arijuelia Woodbury,
Arjay MIller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lorelyn Woods.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joscelin Lee Wolsey.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Riley Dodd Weidman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Billie Ching Xa.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Cordelia Xiou.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Benjamin Chong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Dominique Yayavi.>>[APPLAUSE]
El Yong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nick Young.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Valerie Westcott-Yong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Freida Tong-Yu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hachin Yu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mikayla Yule.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rodrigo Zavalo Guzman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Celine Jeong, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Steven Jung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Henry Jung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jimmy Jung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Johnny Jung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ubing Jung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Fiona Sia Jo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yi Bo Ju.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>It is now my pleasure to introduce the presentation of awards. Susan Arbuckle will present
the Arbuckle Award. Followed by Mara Rajan who will present
the Robichek Award and the Ford Scholar.>>I’m proud to be here in my father’s
name presenting an award that carries forward the values of character and
activism that he lived. Stanford and the people of the Business
School were dear to his heart and integral to his life for decades.>From his early days as
an undergrad in the 1930s, then an MBA student, to Dean of
the Business School in the 1960s just prior to our distinguished
Arjay Miller’s tenure. And later as a Stanford trustee. Nominated and chosen by his or her peers the recipient of the Ernest C
Arbuckle Award is a second year student,. Who by his or her active participation,
initiative, leadership, and personal integrity is judged
as having contributed most to the fulfillment of the goals, of
the graduate school of business in his or her actions,
both within school and society. Classmates describe this year’s
recipient with the following comments. Nobody is given more or
made himself more available. He seems to do everything and do it with more energy than I
have to put toward any one thing. He’s focused on building a community for all of us at the GSB since
the moment he was admitted. I admire not only his strong
involvement in the GSB, but also his strong personal and work ethic. In addition to being a full time student, and highly active in
GSB social activities. He works on interesting outside projects
that seek to improve our society. His friendships are plenty but meaningful. He think positively and proactively. He is the guy who will get involved. Set the tone, and can be counted on. He is the social and emotional lighthouse. He is an ambassador. His energy and laugh are contagious. Most importantly, he’s loyal and vital
member of our class whose inclusiveness and genuine interactions have
likely helped to improve all of us. He has made my journey at the GSB so
much richer. He is known as super sharp. The best dancer in town.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>And a very experienced entrepreneur
with much appreciation, I present this award to Jason Scott.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>The Alexander A Robichek student achievement award in finance was
established to honor Professor Robichek’s outstanding contribution to the teaching
of finance at the Stanford Graduate School of Business from 1960
until his death in 1978. The award is given to an MBA student
selected by the finance faculty for outstanding achievement
in the finance courses. The recipient gets the award and
also has his or her name engraved on a plaque
on display at the GSP. This years recipient of
the Robichek Award is Sauren Sudov.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Among the Arjay Miller scholars, one student’s academic achievement places
him or her at the top of the class. This student is designated as
the Henry Ford II Scholar. The recipient’s name is engraved on
a plaque on permanent display at the GSB. The student also receives
a substantial cash award. How substantial? It’s the equivalent of a year’s tuition
at the GSB, so it’s very substantial. Yes, the 2016 Henry Ford Scholar
is Michael Ding.>>[APPLAUSE]>>That concludes the 2016
Stanford GSB graduation ceremony.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Thank you all for coming and making this a very special day. I invite all of you to join us now for
receptions for each group of graduates at the Knight Management Center
as noted in your program. Let’s have all the graduates stand as we
give them one final round of applause.>>[APPLAUSE] [MUSIC]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *