2018 Foundation Scholarship Student Success Stories

2018 Foundation Scholarship Student Success Stories


I was ecstatic. I was excited. I almost cried a little
when I saw the email. And I just started
to cry because I didn’t expect it to happen. The first thing I did was
I called my mom crying. And I said, I got a
scholarship next year. I didn’t know how many
scholarships I got. I was in my bedroom reading
the email, and I was screaming. And my husband
comes in and says, do you know you’re
waking the baby? And you say you want to study. My name is Azia Kelikoa’elakauaikekai Jaelyn Lualhati, and I’m studying communications
here at Shoreline I want to get my Associates
Degree in Communications. I am the current
student honors council president of the honors
program here on campus. I am also the current
political editor of our student-run newspaper,
The Ebbtide, a job that I have longed for. So I really like involving
myself on campus. The job of my
dreams is to either be a journalist, helping
people and writing, maybe for The New York Times,
just doing what I love, and that’s writing. My family is
currently and has not been in a financial situation
where they can help me out. And I’ve never been the type
to ask, in the first place. I am very independent
as a person. Growing up, I
financially, physically, mentally, and emotionally
supported myself. My depression comes in waves. When I’m depressed,
when I’m stressed, I try to work harder because,
for me, working hard, alleviates those feelings. My name is Brian Edeza. And I’m starting to give my
Pre-nursing Associate Degree so I can transfer to
a four-year college. Well, my parents, they’re
immigrants from Mexico. They moved here in the 1970s. Then they started
working in orchards, doing whatever they could
to provide for their five children. Growing up, I was sick a lot. So I’d go to the hospital. So I thought why
not become a nurse, be the best person that
I could be, and make them smile at least
once in their stay. Volunteering, I just applied
to Seattle Children’s. I got a called. And every Saturday, we
clean all the toys. We take birthday gifts
to some of the patients. And then we play with them
while they’re in the hospital. My name is Cassidy Callihan. And right now I’m
just getting my AA so that I can transfer next
year to Central Washington University. I originally came to Shoreline
on a softball scholarship. My softball family is
some of my best friends, and they’ll always
be my sisters. Phins on three. 1, 2, 3, Phins! My junior year of high
school, my parents both lost their jobs. And we struggled after that. I’m having to pay for not only
school and books and all that, but I’m also having to pay for
housing and utilities and all that. I work a lot. Right now, I’m working at Regal
Cinemas in Lynnwood. My area of study is
Secondary Education with an emphasis in
English and History. After Shoreline, I am going to
be going to Central Washington University. I’m hoping for two years. But it’ll probably
be three years so that I can finish
my master’s degree. My name is Andrew Pratt. I come from a pretty
broken family background. I’ve been homeless 3 times
in the last 12 months. And I have a lot of physical
and mental health issues that have been impacting my
ability to attend school. So the main illness
that I have, that’s called Ehlers-Danlos
syndrome hypermobility type. I have a malformation
in all the production of collagen in my body. So all the ligaments
in my body, they’re stretchier than they should be. I can’t eat a lot of things
because they just don’t move correctly through my stomach. And because I also identify
as transgender and queer, I’ve dealt with a lot of
really bad experiences from that, which lead
to more anxiety and PTSD. And altogether I
am a giant mess, just struggling to
make it in the world and barely keeping it together. My name is Agnes Mbatia a
student of the nursing program. I’m Kenyan from Africa. When I came here, I worked
with a facility that was taking care of the elderly. And I felt, because I’d come
from a teaching background, every time I found
myself so limited on how to explain what is happening. And I said, you know what? I need to be informed. And the only way to be
informed as a caregiver was to be in a nursing school
and get that information. I’m married with
two awesome kids. I have a son. And I also have a
younger daughter who is three years old. And going to nursing
school and having kids, it’s pretty much like
having two programs going on at the same time. When I came to get
my scholarship, I had my whole family
coming with me because we… they knew what it meant. We all knew what it meant
for the whole family. I would say thank you very
much because that scholarship that I received not only
helped me pay for the remaining credits I needed, it
also helped me not have to worry about
should I pay rent or should I pay for school. You’re giving them hope. You’re giving them a
second opportunity. You’re giving them a chance. And you are not
only just allowing them to continue
learning, you’re giving students who may
not be financially capable a variety of options. To have somebody step
forward and give you such a personal gift as
to pay for your education, particularly when you
come from a background where people have reinforced
that you don’t deserve it, it is a life-changing
opportunity. Now I get to go
on in my education and fulfill my dreams. It also teaches us
something that we also need to give when
we get out of here. It teaches me that my process
was empowered by someone else. So I need to empower someone
else going forward, yeah.

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