2019 Grad Gala of Transformative Views: Student Work Slideshow

2019 Grad Gala of Transformative Views: Student Work Slideshow


Fuji Robledo • Information Science Exploring and Understanding Burnout and Wellness in the Nonprofit Context
Burnout in the human services field is a pervasive problem that is difficult to address due to several systemic factors. I am collaborating with nonprofit agencies that provide mental health services to vulnerable populations to better understand burnout and how to best support wellness. Advisers: Amy Voida and Steve Voida Jayne Simpson • Communication The Chris Long Effect: Active Alliances in the NFL This work explores the marginalization of LGBT members and people of color engaged in social justice efforts in the NFL, as well as the impact that straight, White men serving as allies have on the efforts and experiences of marginalized members. Using Chris Long’s expressed support of Michael Sam, the NFL’s first openly gay active player, and Colin Kaepernick, current social justice activist and former NFL quarterback, I examine the impact of allies in the professional sports world and how expressed support can rework narratives about marginalized groups and members. Joanne Esch • Communication The pathways study: A pilot investigation into how women and men describe their jobs and technical career trajectories trajectories This study by the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) investigates how women and men talk about their computing jobs and career pathways. Findings will shed light on the ways in which people’s interests and identities, as well as company dynamics, shape career opportunities, choices and trajectories. Ultimately, these findings will help us identify important ways we might alter job descriptions, leadership development programs, and other internal employee development systems in order to create environments and practices that better recruit, retain, and advance a more diverse range of employees. PIs/Advisers: Catherine Ashcraft & Brad McLain, NCWIT Language as Intra-action: Toward a Feminist Relational Semiotic This paper argues that semiotic entification is key to understanding the relationship between language and violence. Specifically, it suggests that the agentic capacity of language changes as relations are re-cast as entities and states of being at higher levels of abstraction. The paper proposes new theoretical possibilities as well as a pragmatist imperative for feminist relational inquiry. Sam G. West • Communication (Un)Doing the Process: Title IX, Legal Rhetorics, and the Complexities of Consent
This thesis offers an in-depth examination of the rhetorics of legality and consent in the context of four Title IX lawsuits forwarded against colleges by men expelled for committing sexual assault. Adviser: Lisa A. Flores Amanda Clark and Shannon Mullane • Journalism As development plans flood Denver’s poorest neighborhood, fear of gentrification lingers
Appears in The Colorado Sun, 2/5/19 Adviser: Chuck Plunkett Giselle Cesin and Shannon Mullane • Journalism Chasing Home A Boulder police unit uses a unique approach to guide homeless individuals back into stable housing.
Published through Atavist, December 2017 Adviser: Michael Kodas Shannon Mullane • Journalism A silent sorrow: Rural Colorado’s high suicide rate, and what’s driving it
A lack of mental health services make rural residents more vulnerable than city dwellers when experiencing suicidality. The Colorado Independent, 12/20/18 State regulations leave Boulder County residents with dirty drinking water
A Boulder County mobile home park meets Colorado water quality regulations, but its residents haven’t had steady access to clean drinking water for up to ten years, according to one resident. Under the Flatirons, 10/2/2017 Adviser: Michael Kodas libi rose striegl • IAWP Voluntary De-Convenience: A kit for informed technological (dis)engagement A collaborative, performative education project aimed at addressing knowledge and experience gaps and encouraging critical thinking around the social, environmental, political and economic influences of commercial technoculture, while offering alternative models for technological engagement. Adviser: Lori Emerson Rachel Lara van der Merwe • Media Studies My dissertation project, tentatively titled We Are Not South African, is an argument for the decolonization of national identity, using my home country of South Africa as a particular space for theorization and reflection. Adviser: Nabil Echchaibi Yessica del Rincón • Communication Making Space for Borderland Communities in Government Discourses My work seeks to shed light on the ways local government agencies and tribal nations situated on the U.S./Mexico border provide counter-narratives to a dominant federal discourse that perpetuates negative tropes of immigrants. Adviser: Lisa Flores Alexis de Coning • Media Studies Whose Rights? What Rights? The Legitimacy of Rights in the Men’s Rights Movement The men’s rights movement is often framed as a reactionary backlash to feminism. My research looks at the historical use of “rights” to legitimize men’s rights activists’ grievances and claims. Juan I. Ahumada • Communication Communicating Social Identity in First-Generation Student Online Discussions Communicating Social Identity in First-Generation Student Online Discussions
First-generation (FG) students face unique challenges in the college environment. This study explored how FG students communicate their social identity in online contexts and found that they do so among themselves by sharing stories of family challenges and discussing socioeconomic difficulties. Ultimately, they managed their social identity by engaging in two distinct discourses: one of perseverance and one of opportunity. Advisers: Jody Jahn & Lawrence Frey Morgan Klaus Scheuerman • Info Science Algorithmic Identity: Exploring the Ways Gender Identity is Operationalized by Facial Analysis Algorithms We are conducting an analysis of the ways gender is represented in facial analysis technologies, such as facial detection, facial recognition, and facial classification. We are doing this by creating a dataset of diverse gender identities and running them through six commercially available facial classification APIs. Adviser: Jed Brubaker Tara Walker • APRD Self-tracking for Self-efficacy: Managing Bipolar Disorder This study utilizes the Health Belief Model to analyze the way that people with bipolar disorder build self-efficacy through managing illness. We hope our research will contribute to a wider communication environment where patients feel like empowered participants in the recovery and illness-management process. Adviser: Erin Willis
Collaborator: Steven Voida Tammy Matthews & Tara Walker • JRNL & APRD Indigenous representations in The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: A space in between “Jacqueline” and “Jackie Lynn” This paper is a textual analysis of the Native American subplot in the popular Netflix show The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Using indigenous queer theory, we investigate how the character of Jacqueline represents the borderlands between indigenous and white American culture. Chris Bopp • Info Science/ATLAS Exploring and Understanding Burnout and Wellness in the Nonprofit Context In databases used by nonprofits and the government, identifying information (e.g. name, SSN) is collected from clients who are HIV+ or are experiencing homelessness, for the purpose of tying client records together across systems and building a singular digital representation. This project explores the complex role of identification in categorizing, surveilling, and following clients as well as changing public policy, improving programs and controlling access to public services. Adviser/Collaborator: Amy Voida
Committee Member/Collaborator: Lehn Benjamin, Indiana University Rossana Longo-Better • MDST/MAPE Stop the bull and give me access Many underrepresented populations lack access to information about rights and opportunities. By working with KGNU Community Radio, the League of Women Voters of Boulder County and Audio Information Network of Colorado, I have honed my awareness of the systematic yet subtle inequities and injustices that facilitate this urgent problem. My project seeks to provide a cooperative, living platform where underrepresented populations will not only have access to valuable information, but will also contribute their own voices, experiences and stories. Advisors: Michela Ardizzoni, Nathan Schneider, Maeve Conran and Nabil Echchaibi
Collaborators: KGNU Community Radio Tammy Rae Matthews (she/her) • JRNL/MDRP Overall research goals: Create discourse on brave and inclusive spaces in domestic and global journalism and sport Dissertation World Area: Namibia, Africa (and global sport/media in general) My research explores the intersection of gender, media and the international sport environment. My intention is to help eliminate continuing prejudicial responses to gender diversity and problematic media representations that result in violence, detrimental gender schemas and non-transfeminist perceptions that foster new power structures tied to bodies.
Decolonizing Transness in Sport Media: On Transgender Representations in Sports Illustrated. A Summary. Presented at the 2017 International Communication Association conference & received the Top 2 Student Paper Award from the Sports Communication Interest Group.

You Can Play (video made in collaboration with journalism instructor Emilie Johnson, received 35K views in 6 weeks) https://www.facebook.com/YouCanPlayTeam/videos/511194332712201/ Angelica Kalika • Journalism Examining the newsmaking process in community media radio – How a Diversity of Voices Make a Community Whole Adviser: Patrick Ferrucci Gayle Jansen Brisbane • JRNL/MDRP “Reminds me of Jesus”: Evangelical Christian women’s perception of news outlets persecution of Donald J. Trump This dissertation examines evangelical Christian women’s religious identity and moral values as these influence their voting behaviors, views of perceived outgroups, opinions of news outlets, and media routines. The inquiry employs Social/Religious Identity Theory, Cognitive Dissonance and Moral Foundation Theory to analyze qualitative focus group and in-depth interviews. It explores the roots of evangelical Christian women’s relation to such polemic social issues as abortion, same sex marriage and immigration. Adviser: Patrick Ferrucci Logan Rae Gomez • Communication My research has long been about diversity in and outside of academic spaces, with a focus on protest, bodies and, increasingly, temporality and the lived experience for racialized bodies. Specifically, I am exploring literature on Affropessimism and Affrofuturism to see what it offers our contemporary moments. Through the work of #SayHerName, I seek to understand how time influences which voices are heard. Ultimately, I hope to center theorizations of time with respect to everyday resistance and struggle. For more examples of my work, see:
• Flores, Lisa A. and Logan Rae Gomez. “Nightmares of Whiteness: Dreams and Deportability in the Age of Trump.” Interrogating the Communicative Power of Whiteness, edited by Dawn Marie D. McIntosh, Dreama G. Moon, and Thomas K. Nakayama, 2018.
• Gomez, Logan Rae. Review of The Mark of Criminality: Rhetoric, Race, and Gangsta Rap in the War-on-Crime Era, by Bryan J. McCann. Rhetoric Society Quarterly, 2018, pp. 1-4.
• Rae, Logan. “Re-Focusing the Debate on Trigger Warnings: Privilege, Trauma, and Disability in the Classroom.” First Amendment Studies, vol. 50, no. 2, 2016, pp. 95-102. Tammy Rae Matthews (she/her) • JRNL/MDRP You Can Play Video made in collaboration with journalism instructor Emilie Johnson, received 35K views in 6 weeks.
https://www.facebook.com/YouCanPlayTeam/videos/511194332712201/ Sean Kenney • Communication Engaging “diversity work” queerly: How do people make sense of when they are engaging in organizational diversity work, and when they aren’t? This project seeks to understand what norms orient organizational diversity work, and how these norms shape opportunities for achieving meaningful change in organizations. Adviser: Karen Ashcraft Sean Kenney & Kathryn Joan Leslie • COMM Queer pedagogy as praxis in non-normative organizing As an anti-normative approach, queer pedagogy provides an important lens for thinking about praxis in organizational contexts. Kathryn Joan Leslie • Communication Queer(ing) Professionalism, Professionalizing Queer I study the intersections of bodies, professionalism and difference (e.g., race, gender, sexuality, ability) in the context of neoliberal work(ing). My dissertation examines professionalism as a practice through the lens of queerness, queer theories and affective assemblages. The project entails ethnographic fieldwork with Lesbians Who Tech, the largest professional association for LGBTQ folks in the U.S. I’d love to chat with CMCI colleagues about organizing, queer theories, the body/embodiment, affect and new materialism and the tech industry. Adviser: Karen Lee Ashcraft Vincent Russell • Communication This Machine has a Soul: Evaluating Denver Participatory Budgeting This community-based ethnographic study explores the ways that public deliberation in Denver’s first participatory budgeting (PB) processes promoted social justice, incorporated marginalized groups and redirected funds to under resourced communities. The project discusses the implications of PB for (re)vitalizing U.S. democracy with a focus on equity and justice for all. Adviser: Lawrence R. Frey
Community partners: Warm Cookies of the Revolution, Project VOYCE, and Project Belay Kellie Brownlee • Communication The Communal Dilemma of Being Better Together: Christian Discourse in Church Debates on Human Sexuality This project focuses on discourses of inclusion or exclusion of LGBTQ+ people in an evangelical Christian church denomination and how members manage the communal dilemma of unity in the midst of ideological conflict. Adviser: David Boromisza-Habashi Lydia Reinig • COMM/CCDE Building Bridges: A Community Collaboration for Culture Change As part of my graduate research fellowship with CDE, I have been involved in the design, facilitation and synthesis of Phases I and II of Building Bridges, a City of Boulder initiative with the goal of shifting the city’s culture of public engagement in ways that make it more accessible and inclusive of diverse voices. Building Bridges employs principles from design thinking and deliberation to bring together community members in public forums. Adviser: Leah Sprain Toma Pieu • Critical Media Practices Blissful displacements and border sensitivity: Rethinking migration and public space, from the Aral Sea to Brooklyn, NY Collaborators: Luiza Parvu, Kevin Sweet

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