California Dream Act Application

California Dream Act Application


okay so let’s take a few minutes and
talk about the importance of the California Dream Act application the
implication it has for our undocumented students and all the benefits that it
has as well so let’s keep going and we’re going to talk about the California
Dream Act so first of all it’s important to note that when it comes to supporting
our undocumented students California is truly the leader so big round of
applause for California we have a lot of available aid for dreamers in the state
of California so obviously Cal Grant middle class
scholarship some of these things we have talked about or we will talk about
Chaffee grant UC University grant CSU state university grants so that’s
institutional aid California promise grant remember we talked that’s formerly
the the bog fee waiver the student success completion grant the EOPS now in
some work-study programs so work-study is typically federally funded so
traditional work-study programs are federally funded so our Dreamers don’t
qualify for that at least yet however some schools have their own
version of a work-study program and they use money coming from a different
internal source to pay for that so some schools do have work-study like programs
for students there’s also private scholarships and there’s also this very
cool thing coming in 2021 so I said there’s not really a lot of
work-study out there for our Dreamers beginning in 2021
the Cal Grant B Service incentive program will allow students to to volunteer
their time and in exchange they’re going to get paid and it will sort of take the
place of the the work-study program so it’ll be one more thing that the
Dreamers can use to get money for school this is the California Dream Act
application now depending on when you’re watching this you may say mmm this
doesn’t look like the one I’m seeing online now and that’s because the
California Dream Act application is going to be revised beginning October
1st 2019 so this is just general information that we hope you find useful
when the all the updates are in place we’ll
probably rerecord this training but in the interim at least gives you an idea
of how the California Dream application works and who it is for so this is a
screenshot of the California Dream Act application now you’re going to notice
that there’s a link there that says hey check out some additional resources etc
if you click on that you can get a lot of a lot of resources that would be
helpful not only to your students but also to you so one thing that we suggest
is that if you work with Dreamers and you assist them and filling out this
application it’s a great idea to print out the paper version of the application
as a reference because you’re gonna find if you’re on the phone with a student or
the students is describing a problem that they’re having with the application
you’re going to be able to flip through the paper version and say oh I see the
question or the questions that you’re talking about it will make life much
easier so there are good resources that’s and if you click on that link
that’s one place to find the paper version as well as several other things
and and of course who can apply so undocumented students obviously you
don’t have to have DACA TPS which is temporary protected status holders can
apply and you visa holders can also apply so that’s kind of generally
speaking the group of students who are eligible to apply with this application
it doesn’t mean automatically that they’re going to qualify but it means
that they have the status that allows them to at least apply so let’s talk
about AB 540 you’re going to hear AB 540 a lot I’m just going to bring all
this information up so we can see it AB 540 is not just one law AB 540 is a
collection of laws and Ed code and Senate bills and all together these
things form AB 540 so AB 540 wasn’t just the you know a switch that was
flipped okay now these Dreamers are eligible to apply here’s the California
Dream Act application it was a long road and so what you need to remember just in
general about AB 540 is that it is really a combination of a lot of
different things that allows these students to number one apply for aid
number two pay in-state tuition you know and number three be able to get
financial aid from the state and from the institutions as well as a number of
other places now how do you qualify to be AB 540 eligible so here’s an example
of what this looks like and this has changed recently it’s actually been
expanded so if we look at option A we notice that this is sort of the more
traditional one that you may have heard about in the last two or three years you
have to have three years of California high school credits even if you didn’t
attend for the full three years you have to have three years of high school
credits and you have to have three years of total attendance in most normally the
high school but let’s say you have three years of high school credits but you
weren’t sort of physically there for three years you can make up for that by
having attended either an elementary school or a middle school in the state
of California so that’s one way you qualify now there’s this new relatively
new SB 68 which you may or may not have heard about
and so what SB 68 does is it just it allows for a broader definition of who
can be considered AB 540 eligible because it changed those that A
requirements that we have listed here and it includes now you can be an adult
school graduate for example you can have you know three years partially at a high
school and then partially in an adult school you can be at a community college
for two years let’s say you only had one year at high school but then you had two
years at the Community College so some combination of three years of attendance
or the equivalent at any of these schools high school Adult School or
Community College for up to two years will also qualify you so what does that
mean that means hey you don’t automatically have to have been a
California high school graduate in order to qualify for these programs you don’t
have to have been necessarily at a California high school for three years
right so it’s a little bit of a game changer it is expanding AB 540
eligibility and we’re going see this sort of happened more and more
as people become aware of the new legislation and more students become
eligible to use the new legislation in order to qualify for AB 540 so let’s
continue to talk about AB 540 requirements okay so the degree of
transfer eligibility so we said graduation from a California high school
grade or the equivalent so if you take an equivalency exam
like the GED or the Hi-SET or the TASC examples then that would work okay
if you earn an associate’s degree from a California Community College or if you
meet the minimum requirements to transfer to a CSU or UC that’s the
degree or transfer eligibility remember previously it was only you had to have
graduated from a California high school or have the equivalent credits that was
it that was the only path you could travel to be AB 540 eligible but that’s
change so the associate degree at a community college or meeting the minimum
requirements to transfer to a CSU or UC and those two things could kind of go
hand-in-hand those also will qualify the student so
that part’s change there’s also the non-resident tuition exemption so
students have to file a waiver it really it’s called an affidavit with the
college or university and really what they’re doing with this is that they are
saying that they will move forward to legalize their immigration status
students sometimes freak out about that or their parents you know we need to
tell them not to because frankly it’s not a big deal it’s just a requirement
it’s rubber-stamped it’s put into a drawer and and it allows the student to
qualify to pay non-resident tuition and also allows them to be certified to be
eligible to apply for Cal Grant under the DREAM Act application so having the
affidavit is important you have to have it but you know we don’t want students
to freak out because they have to get it it’s not that big of a deal
alright let’s take a second and talk about DACA so DACA is deferred action
for childhood arrivals we know that DACA continues to be a
little bit of a political football so right now students can still have DACA
and students can actually still renew DACA what they can’t do is apply for
DACA for the first year so this program which was started by executive action
under President Obama basically said hey these young people that came to the
United States when they were babies or toddlers we’re going to give them a
measure of protection against deportation and we’re also going to give
them these SSNs that are valid for work purposes only so yeah it’s a social
but it’s really used specifically in order to work legally so you know DACA
was a program that hundreds of thousands of students took advantage of and
there’s still hundreds of thousands who have DACA so a couple things you need to
understand it’s really important if a student has DACA that has zero impact on
their ability to apply or not apply with the DREAM Act application right you
don’t have to have DACA if you have DACA great but it’s not a requirement
so students will often times confuse DACA with the DREAM Act application and
even though it serves the same group of people it’s not the same thing
so DACA is great if you’re working with students with DACA and they’re able to
renew it you definitely want them to do that and we’re gonna see how this plays
out with DACA we still don’t know what’s going to happen okay one thing that’s
important students have a Social Security card so a lot of times they
think because they have this DACA SSN that they’re now able to fill out the
FAFSA application right can they no if you have the DACA SSN you can
only do the DREAM Act application you cannot do a FAFSA so it’s important to
let students know that because that is a very common occurrence selective service
so Selective Service is required of all males between 18 and 25 they have to
register in order to get financial aid and that
includes our Dreamers so the the hurdle or the additional hurdle that they have
is that unlike the FAFSA on the DREAM Act application you can no longer
register for selective service so that part was removed in part to protect the
identity of those students so that part was removed now the good news is hey it
was done for a good reason the bad news is hey CADAA filer DREAM Act filer you
still have to register for selective service right you still have to do it if
you’re working at a high school and you’re working with these students or an
advocacy group or whatever it is you’re doing if you’re working with Dreamers it
is mission critical that you have a stack of the forms that they need to
register with because they have to mail in those forms so you can go on to
Selective Service and print them out you can go to the post office and they have
a really cool sort of you know oversized postcard kind of thing that they can use
whatever it is you really need to have these available because when you’re
talking to students all male students you need to say hey you guys if you’re
within a month of your 18th birthday you know or you’re going to be 18 you know
as you start college you have to register for selective service right
that’s just the way it is and you know we don’t want to single out dreamers but
we do want to say everyone has to do it if you weren’t able to do it on the
FAFSA we have a paper form or you forgot to do it on the FAFSA no problem you can
mail in the paper form or you can go back into your FAFSA if you did the
DREAM Act application I have the paper form here it is easy to fill out and
send in and you want to do that early because that can take three months or
more for them to get back the card that says you have successfully registered
for selective service now why is that important that’s important because if a
DREAM Act student is randomly selected for verification so a male student
that’s one of the things that they’re going to be checked for did they
register for selective service and can they prove it so you can imagine that
if you don’t mail this thing in early it’s very likely you’re going to show up
at that financial aid office at the college and you’re gonna say yeah I did
do it but I didn’t get anything back yet and that can hold up your financial aid
so I’m going to reiterate so it’s important that if you’re working with
these kiddos and they’re going to turn 18 as they start college shortly before
or shortly thereafter you need to have them fill out this form right and you
need to tell them you need to wait for the proof and then keep that because
that might be something that you need so when you’re filling out the Selective
Service I referred earlier to the students who have the DACA SSN they
should just leave that blank they’re not required to put a social you don’t need
to put a social to register for selective service so we suggest you just
leave a blank and mail it in just like that okay so we work with an
organization that does a lot of good work in the Bay Area but they’re
certainly their presence online is important to schools up and down the
state of California and outside of California to a degree so immigrants
rising was formerly called educators for fair consideration or e4fc and they’ve
since rebranded themselves as immigrants rising so I just want to point out that
they have a lot of really really great information on their website if you are
working with undocumented students I guarantee that you can find 90% of
everything that you need to answer a question about financial aid or status
or DACA and a whole host of other things and they also have a lot of really good
resources so my point to you is if you need help with that
with that cohort by all means visit immigrantsrising.org and if you’re in
the greater Bay Area they have a presentation team that will go out to
your school high school or college or your organization and they can
present and get you caught up on what’s going on currently they’re great about
updating us on legislation that’s impacting our dreamers just everything
so by all means if you have the opportunity check out that information immigrants rising has really been our
school districts one-stop-shop for a long time they’ve been a collaborative
community partner that we go to and we trust I’ve worked with many undocumented
students in the ten years that I’ve been teaching it’s difficult for students to
come out it’s important to realize that you’re serving people from very diverse
communities we hear all of these like bills and legislations that are out
there students are feeling confused it’s hard to internalize all that information
but I know where I can go to look it up immigrants risings website immigrantsrising.org what I love about immigrants rising it’s their California dream act
checklist the educational resource binders the SB 68 guide scholarship
information is always always always helpful the intake service on the website
which helps young people understand their immigration status and what their
options are for adjusting that status it really helps me be able to point
students to whatever they might need but also to get the answer myself to then be
able to support other students immigrants writing has been great at
growing with and adapting to the climate to policy changes and continuing to
provide this information for educators if there are educators out there who are
in schools where maybe there’s not a lot of support yet friend documented
students we trust Immigrants Rising and we go to them

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