Flipped Classroom Podcast: What does a flipped classroom look like?

Flipped Classroom Podcast: What does a flipped classroom look like?


the flipped classroom podcast what does
the flipped classroom look like presented by Jeffrey Anderson and Larry
Hess from Ohio University learning objectives after watching this podcast
you should be able to remember and understand some of the characteristics
of a flipped classroom two methods for structuring class discussion and how
class participation changes with the flip model first let’s look at the
traditional classroom where students sit passively and listen to the instructor
the sage on the stage as he or she delivers course concepts via lecture the
flipped classroom looks much different the flipped classroom instructors work
actively with students students work collaboratively in pairs or in teams to
solve class problems to apply concepts in the flipped classroom it’s much more
active and much more engaging much more noisy and much more interactive than the
traditional classroom it helps if we take a look at understanding today’s
college students Mark Prensky coined the term digital natives those who have
grown up with technology born from 1981 to 2000 technology has been an everyday
part of their life this is important in terms of how these students expect to be
engaged in the classroom and outside the classroom let’s look at some characteristics of a
flipped classroom first students typically reach higher orders of
critical thinking moving from the remembering an understanding domains to
application and analysis the flipped classroom provides the opportunity to
give course material context by applying it to real-world situations in the flip
model students take ownership of their learning and can use material and use
their knowledge to lead one another during class and perhaps most
importantly the flipped classroom transform students
from passive listeners to active learners collaboration is at the heart
of in-class activities used in the flipped classroom one common method of
promoting discussion in class is to use the think pair share technique this
technique requires that the learner first consider individually questions
raised by the instructor then students are paired with their classmates and
given time to discuss these questions together finally the questions are
shared with the class as students are called upon to answer by the professor
another way to engage students with discussion is a technique called
numbered heads together in this technique students are formed into teams
of three to six they then count off in each team members assigned a number the instructor then poses a question students put their heads together and
discuss the issue so that everyone on the team knows and understands the
answer and then the instructor calls on students my number to answer the
question for the class we’ve all experienced situations where only a few
students talk in class and some students talk so much that they prevent others
from speaking in class discussions are out of balance students feel excluded
from the Class one way to maintain balance is to call on students by name regularly during the term in an evenly
distributed way keeping track of who you called upon allows this balence to be
achieved in this model class participation goes from voluntary to
mandatory and instructor can use two types of questions when calling on
students first as the warm call method where the instructor will identify
students who will be called upon later to answer specific discussion questions
the intent of the warm call is to motivate students to be prepared to
answer their assigned questions Assigned thoughtfully and to get support
from their peers as they prepare also instructor should use cold calls where
they call upon students to answer questions without prior knowledge these
cold calls provide an incentive for students to think carefully about the
issue as there is always a possibility they will be called upon to answer in
class summary in this podcast we reviewed some characteristics of the
flipped classroom the think pair share and numbered heads together methods for
structuring class discussion and class participation including warm calls and
cold calls

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *