Healthy People eLearning Webinar: Reducing Childhood Obesity (Part 2 of 10)

Healthy People eLearning Webinar: Reducing Childhood Obesity (Part 2 of 10)


>>LAURA KETTEL KHAN: let’s go to the next
slide. What I’d like to talk about today is what is the evidence related to obesity prevention
especially at the community level. Obesity has been on the rise over the past
two decades. And, I think most of you on the phone know that. Between 1988–1994 and 2009–2010,
the obesity rate among children and adolescents age 2 to 19 increased by 69% or 10% to 16.9%. Looking at both overweight and obesity combined, nearly 1 out of 3 children was overweight
or obese between 2007-2008. The obesity epidemic continues to be a challenging health concern. Next slide, please. Obesity is a national epidemic, it increases the risk for numerous
health outcomes and also causes higher medical costs and a lower quality of life. Obese children
are more likely to have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, breathing problems,
joint problems, and other chronic diseases. They are also more likely to develop social
and psychological problems. In addition, obese children are more likely to become obese adults.
Which is even more problematic. Chronic diseases associated with obesity — such
as heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes — are among the most prevalent, costly, and
preventable of all health problems. The medical care costs of obesity in the United States
are staggering. In 2008, these costs totaled more than $147 billion dollars.
By addressing obesity, we can help reduce the risk of life-threatening, costly, chronic
conditions and help address the significant costs for the health care system. Next slide,
please. What I’d like to focus on today, just really
quickly, is a significant problem in terms of the scientific evidence. We know obesity
is a problem of caloric intake and expenditure of calories, you know, out But the problem
is the evidence base is very, very weak especially at the population level. So, one of our major
goals is to build this population-based evidence. The strategy is to link local and multi-sector
partners and scaling up that knowledge to state and national efforts. Next slide, please.
The high-priority strategies and indicators that we have are number one, increase access
to healthy foods and beverages by providing access to healthier food and retail or healthier
food retail and farmers markets. Secondly, to implement food service guidelines and nutrition
standards where foods and beverages are available in priority settings, such as early child
care centers and worksites. Next slide, please. The third is implementing policies and practices
that create supportive nutritional environments in schools, including: establishing standards
for all competitive foods; prohibiting advertising of unhealthy foods; and promoting healthy
foods in in schools, including those sold and served within the school meal program,
from USDA and and others, as well as in. And finally increase physical activity access
and outreach by creating or enhancing access to places for physical activity, which focus
on walking combined with informational outreach, and design our communities and our streets
so that physical activity is an easy thing to do or so that individuals can be easily
physical active. Next slide, please. What I’d like to share with you is, and it’s
very exciting news, we have a number of places or localities around the country that are
starting to report success. Next slide, please. Those promising localities include states
such as California, Mississippi, New Mexico, and West Virginia. But then we also have individual communities or cities such as Anchorage in Alaska, El Paso in Texas, Granville in North
Carolina, Kearney in Nebraska, New York City, Philadelphia, and Vance in North Carolina.
Next slide, please. These locations that are reporting success are extremely exciting, and, but we need to, you know, investigate what they’re doing,
how they’re doing it, what it has taken to achieve those decreases in in body mass index
or obesity rates. So, from CDC’s perspective, or the federal government’s perspective, I
want to share a few things about what we’re doing relative to documenting that success
as well as supporting it. The first is a funding announcement or a federal,
state level grant program that we’re starting right now this year. It will be announced,
just in the next couple weeks, in August. That there will be state-level grants that
focus on healthy eating and active living with a new emphasis that we have not ever
done before. That it’s not just community efforts in terms of schools and and governments
and worksites but we’re incorporating healthcare and clinical connections to the community
that support and synergize the efforts to support healthy eating and active living.
So that’s that’s a grant or a funding mechanism. But the second is a different approach of
supporting or encouraging new lines of research that will build the evidence base for us over
the next coming years. One area in particular, one level of focus, is a partnership called
NCCOR or the National Collaborative for Childhood Obesity Research. And it’s a partnership between
the NIH, USDA, CDC, those are the three federal agencies, and then the Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation, which is a private foundation. And we’re doing a whole host of things that
accelerate or are attempting to accelerate what we know via research and evaluation.
But two things I’d like to point out, or two activities that I’d like to point out, are
the registry of studies, which is, it’s a very simple concept where we are going to
put in one location on the NCCOR website, which is NCCOR.org. Just it’s it’s going to
be one website that links all these, a number of major research and or evaluation studies
in terms of their instrumentation, their methodologies, their analytical approaches, to looking at
population-based obesity prevention. So, that’s one.
Another is a project called Childhood Declines in Obesity: What’s Working. And it, this is,
if I could just step back for a second and I shared some of those locations around the
United States that are showing declines in obesity. What we’re doing is actually going
to those sites and trying to document, and do a deep dive, in terms of assessment of
what did they really do. I mean what were the components that had to happen, how much
funding did they need, what types of interventions did they engage in, were they policies? You
know, just the whole gambit of what you can wrap your mind around. So that’s another thing
that’s happening. Next slide, please. On this slide, are just a, just a few resources
that you all might be interested in in terms of evaluation and helping you recognize how
to assess success and how to evaluate those successes. Just to have those in your back
pocket.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *