How to Create Engaging eLearning Activities | How to Create the Best eLearning

How to Create Engaging eLearning Activities | How to Create the Best eLearning


Hey everyone. In this video today, I’m
going to be talking about the CCAF model. So, the CCAF model is a model that we use created by Allen Interactions and we use this model to create engaging eLearning
activities. So, I recently spoke about this at an eLearning event that I went
to and I’ve really thought it’d be a great idea to share it on video for
anyone else who is interested. We absolutely love the model, we think it
makes a real impact on our activities and that’s what our clients tell us as
well. So, the model is split into four different parts. The first part is
context, the second part is challenge, the third part is activities and the
fourth part is feedback. So, in this video I’m going to go through each part and
talk about how you can implement it into your eLearning activities. So, the first
part is context and context is all about creating a meaningful framework and
conditions. So, that’s about when you’re designing your activity… what situation
are you going to put your learner into? and the best way to do it is to create a
realistic situation. So, for example, if your learner’s a nurse and you’re needing
to teach them how to work with a patient then put them into that hospital room
with the patient and by putting them into that environment they can see how
they can use the skill outside of the learning situation and they also
understand why it’s relevant to them and the intent of it. So, when you’re
designing your context think about what would the learner see. If it’s in an
office, include the desks, include the computers, the mouse, the cups of coffee,
the other employees that would be around them and really put them into that
context from the very beginning of the situation or activity. So, this is an
example that we have created here for context. So, you can see in this activity
the learner’s walking into their office space. They can see their two colleagues
laughing at a desk behind them. They’re walking towards their own desks. You can
see the computer, the coffee mug and it really sets the scene of the learner
walking into their work environment. Next up we have a challenge. So, the learner
needs to be challenged and this allows them to think that their decisions make
an impact. So, the sort of actions that they take, how much information they
retain from the learning experience, actually makes a difference and in this
situation you can see that the challenge is their co-workers are laughing at them,
they’ve walked into the office space and they don’t know what to do, they
feel uncomfortable and the challenge is what are they going to do next? The
third part is activity. So, activity is about the response or gesture to the
challenge. So, now that the learner has been presented with the challenge. They
need to figure out what they want to do, they feel uncomfortable, their co-workers
are laughing at them. What are their actions going to be? and you can see in the red boxes here on screen that these are their options for responding and these
options were actually what we received from our clients. So, this is what they
told us were the top things that people did when they felt uncomfortable that
someone was laughing at them or making fun. So, this is realistic to their
environment and the activity is they need to select how they want to react.
The last part of the activity is feedback. So, that’s all about telling
your learner… have they made the right decision? Or not just have they made the
right decision? The most important part is showing them what will happen if they
make that decision. So, when they select one of those options, we can see here,
we’ve got an example feedback screen up. They’ve decided to approach them to find out what’s going on. They ended up being included in on the joke and
it was all fine. So, this shows that rather than just saying that was the
wrong response or that was the right response. We’ve actually shown the
learner through feedback, if you made this decision, this is what is likely to
have happened. So, we’ve done that and we’ve also provided tips. So, you can see
that we’ve provided the user with actions and behaviors that they can
actually take away from the course and implement to support them in these sort
of situations. Something else that came up with the client was around
assumptions. So, you can see here that a part of the screen says… see what was
actually happening. So, on this screen here we’ve shown the user, this is what
was actually happening in this situation. So, this is a
big learning around not making assumptions and checking in with what’s
going on. So, this feedback we believe really gives
the user a full view of the sort of decisions they make, what impacts they
have and some actions and behaviours that they can take away. So, that’s it for this
blog video on the CCAF model. We absolutely love the CCAF model. We believe
it allows you to create realistic, engaging and challenging activities that
reflect the real environment that your learner’s in. So, check out the CCAF model
it’s by Allen Interactions and thank you Allen Interactions for
creating such an awesome thing and enjoy!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *