Liberate Learning Insights – Episode 2 – Mediocre vs Good Instructional Design

Liberate Learning Insights – Episode 2 – Mediocre vs Good Instructional Design


Wanted to share with you the difference between
good instructional design and mediocre instructional design. I guess an example I’ll give you if you have
a little bit of content and there’s three key sections. We get those three key sections and create
a button number 1, 2, 3 and you cut and paste that content under each button, welcome to
the screen we are going to learn something, click on the button below and when you’re
finished click next. Really basic instructional design, it’s barely
instructional design it’s just putting content under buttons, buttons numbered 1, 2, and
3 does not add any meaning to whatever information was in that button as well in terms of the
content that would appear if I click on it. So very shallow instructional design as opposed
to something that is more authentic, and case-study based that generates a level of empathy with
the learner, and an example would be if we are assessing someone to have a customer-service
conversation, let’s say it’s a bank, and someone comes up to the customer service representative
or teller the first thing you need to do is perhaps in this learning journey would be
to identify what’s acceptable in terms of ID. So yes, we can accept a drivers licence, and
a passport and a Medicare card or whatever it might be, but we don’t want to have multiple
choice or true and false. It might be that yeah, okay, I might know
that I can accept a passport but I can click on a little icon and launch an image of a
passport and this one shows me it’s expired so that’s more authentic and then there would
be a conversation that would take place and something where there is not a right or wrong
or true/false, it’s more like there’s a grey in here. This is the situation and you’ve got the answer,
you’ve got the information that’s correct, but did you consider this and we might need
to watch this in the future or something simple as an icon that’s a future-state, that here’s
the information that we’re telling you now but the future-state icon has that turn of
events and now I need to learn something else, so there is much more depth and much more
learning that’s going to be applied and more authentic and yes, it does take a little bit
more of extra effort from an instructional design point of view but it’s far worth it
from a user experience and an engagement and learning point of view. Hopefully, that’s helpful.

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