Microsoft Education BETT 2020 Keynote: Hybrid Intelligences – Amplifying Human Potential

Microsoft Education BETT 2020 Keynote: Hybrid Intelligences – Amplifying Human Potential


(upbeat music) – Ladies and gentlemen, welcome back. Now, famously, of course,
computers don’t feel, I mean they don’t even think, they just do what we program them to do. But as you will all know,
we can now program them to do an increasingly
amazing range of things, so including, it seems, being aware of emotion. And I am now gonna hand the stage over for the next 40 minutes, to
talk about hybrid intelligence, to the company Microsoft. Please welcome the Vice President of Worldwide Education, Anthony Salcito. (audience applauding) (upbeat music) – My mic is coming on, thank you. I am super happy to be here at Bett, are you guys happy to be at Bett? This is always an amazing opportunity for us to celebrate great
educators around the world who are doing more to help their students, to hear and learn from school
leaders who are driving change and transformation in their
area, or system, or country, it’s also a great opportunity for annual events like this to pause and reflect on the progress
we’ve made year over year. We’re in a new decade,
2020, and I started, maybe I did the bad thing. I
reflected on my time at Bett and realized, in addition to
that I’m getting quite old, I’ve been at Bett for 10 years, this is my 10th year at Bett. And I thought about, what kind
of progress are we making? Are we changing the landscape
in our classrooms and beyond? And certainly we recognize
that technology is transforming and doing more, faster, cheaper, better, across all the objects and activities that you see across
the show floor at Bett. It’s exciting, a little daunting for some educators, perhaps, thinking about the
complexity of all that thing, but it got me to reflect that
the pace that we need to keep is not just thinking about technology, it’s about shifting the narrative of what technology is capable for. When I think back on,
not only the last decade, but really my 30 years of working with education transformation in schools around the world, I reflect that most of that has
been on serving the schools, the systems, and the classroom first. We’re gonna bring technology
in, and hope educators change, hope it impacts and shifts students. And addition to thinking differently, we’ve got to shift what
technology is now capable of. With new technologies and
focus, like data and AI, the availability of the cloud to extend the borders of
the impact that we can make, we gotta have a different lens for how we think about
student achievement, and shift our focus. And really, that’s what
this session is all about, is recognizing the shift to
embrace a hybrid intelligence, to extend our ability as
humans to achieve more. And we’re undergoing a
great time of convergence. We see social and emotional learning blending with academic instruction, schools embracing both the
need for curriculum rigor and the importance of celebrating and embracing student skills. And lastly, and perhaps most importantly, students are no longer sitting
passively by to be taught, they’re active, they
wanna make a difference in their communities, in the world, with not only their voice, and they’re saying it louder and louder, but they wanna be a part of change, they wanna make a
difference on the planet. And when we shift our focus
on the technology landscape and the roadmap of all
the vendors across Bett, on the foundation of
driving human ingenuity, celebrating the need to support
students on their journey far beyond the classroom,
we can achieve more. It strikes me as schools
struggle to bring data and AI into classrooms
to celebrate the power of personalized learning for students, that we’ve gotta lift our expectations beyond just learning outcomes. When we embrace the power
of personalized learning, we’re celebrating the ability for students to go far beyond the
potential limited by a grade, or a test, or class, or a course, but to have them be active participants in changing the world. And technology is helping us
do what we do best as humans, connect, collaborate, share. And increasingly, technology
innovation is helping us connect to our emotions,
how we feel and respond, and when we’re at our best
connecting with others. Now, we also have to recognize,
as we make the shift, that we’ve gotta celebrate and embrace the amazing
potential within our students. Last year on this stage at
Bett, I had the great pleasure, and many of you who attended
may remember Shagun Maheshwari, a 15-year-old girl, she’s 16
years old now, from Canada, and she’s doing a simple thing, like understanding genome
sequencing, patterning with AI, to help cure cancer, and
advance cancer research. And she, like many of us, was impacted by a family
member with cancer, and it motivated her to learn
AI, and data, and genomics. And we’ve got to empower students
to think about technology as an enabler for their
potential and their passion. And students are doing far
more than speaking out, they’re creating and
innovating with technology to solve real problems
the planet is facing. And we all recognize that we need help, and we need innovators, and entrepreneurs in all of our societies. And we’ve gotta shift
our focus from grades to creating the foundation
for change in our world. And students have the potential, and we’ve got to celebrate
every voice, every one of us. We often talk about a talent gap that exists the around the world, and there is no such thing. The gap is not the talent,
we have the talent, it’s in all of our
classrooms around the world, we’ve gotta connect that
talent with opportunity, with expectations, and with technology empowering their dreams to achieve more. And when we think about every student, we’ve gotta recognize that far too many
students around the world are not part of this conversation, and we’ve gotta work to bring them up. And this is perhaps most
true in areas of conflict, and conflict-affected youth have been far too long
left out of the innovations and potential with technology. But no longer, thanks
to some of the efforts our next speaker will share,
about what we can do to, not only show what’s possible with conflict-affected
students and children, but to really provide a template
and example for all of us. So please join me in welcoming
Leila Toplic to talk more about how we can extend
our value to all students. (“Shine” by Years and Years) – Thank you. Thank you, Anthony, hello. So, I wanna start by
giving you some context for why I’m here today. 25 years ago, in 1995, some of you might remember
what you were doing back then, I left my childhood home
in former Yugoslavia, I fled my country to save my life, and I found safety in a refugee
camp in southern Hungary. That is where I spent a year
of my life with my family. And I also had the opportunity to teach, teach English and art to
conflict-affected youth. It was in the refugee
camp back in the mid ’90s, where I discovered, for the first time, computers and software, and that’s what led me on
the path of technology. And why I’m excited to
be here with you today to talk about how we might use technology to enable all of our
conflict-affected youth to get back on track, and to thrive. Now, you might think this
won’t be interesting to you, so it’s a good time to check email, but I think this will be relevant to you. And here’s why, this group
of conflict-affected youth is not only a significant
part of our society, we’re talking about
millions of young people who represent our collective future. But they’re also representative of the types of needs and challenges that many of our youth will face in terms of how they access
learning, what they learn, and how they connect learning to meaningful real-world opportunities. They’re also representative
of the types of shifts that we need to make in education in order to enable all of
our young people to thrive. And by solving for the
needs of this group of youth and by learning from the
solutions that we create, I think we can help all of our youth. Now, let me start by
providing some context for conflict-affected youth before I share some of the
solutions we’re creating. Today, an unprecedented
70.8 million people have been forced from home. Among them are 25.9 million refugees, over half of whom are under the age of 18, they’re children and adolescents. And just during these 40
minutes that we have together, 1,200 people, children, parents, teachers, will be forcibly displaced due
to conflict and persecution, and not only that the number
of displaced is growing, but also the amount of time that a person spends as a refugee
has increased to 26 years. So what that means for young
people is that conflicts and displacement have disrupted
the time in their lives that is typically dedicated to
what we’re focusing on here, which is learning and development. Millions of young people have been forced to drop out of school, work
in very difficult conditions to support themselves and their families, marry early, and abandon
their hopes and dreams. And young people are very much aware that this loss cannot be recovered. Yet, what I’ve heard over and over again, from the conflict-affected
youth in places like Lebanon, Jordan, Kenya, is that they’re
eager to get back on track. They’re optimistic, they’re creative, they’re hungry to learn, they’re
also hungry to contribute to their communities, as
future social entrepreneurs, as business leaders, as
innovators, as teachers. And to make that possible,
young people have told me that they need three things, they need opportunities to
grow to their full potential. This includes being able to access education anywhere and any time. They need to access to meaningful work. And there’s a real sense of urgency to acquire in-demand skills quickly and connect them to viable
economic opportunities, whether it’s in the communities
where you live, or remotely. They also need to feel
inspired to lead change. And that includes access
to meaningful opportunities for their voices to be heard in their communities around the world. That also includes young people becoming active participants and creators, not just beneficiaries and consumers of the solutions created
elsewhere and for them. So how do we begin delivering on this? At NetHope, I work in NetHope, which is a nonprofit technology consortium of 57 Global NGOs, organizations like Save the
Children, Plan International, Oxfam, and the Norwegian Refugee Council. We believe that technology
has the potential to be a game-changer in
how young people access and experience learning, how they become active
participants and creators, and how we connect the learning to what is meaningful to them,
and oftentimes, that’s work. And while technology
is not a silver bullet, it can be a powerful tool and equalizer. So let me share with you one example of how we might use some
of the AI capabilities to meet both the urgent and ongoing needs of conflict-affected youth. Now, the Middle East and North
Africa is one of the regions where I spent a lot of time
over the past three years. In that region, 15 million children, between the ages of five
and 14, are out of school. Add to that another 10 million that are risk of dropping out,
plus the millions of youth that are out of school and working. For these young people, school
is oftentimes out of reach. Some have told me that going
to classroom is a luxury. Mentors, role models,
teachers are not available where young people live, and the abundance of the learning resources, I’ve seen so much here
on the show floor today, that abundance is just not
visible and accessible to them. This photo is from my visit to Za’atari camp in northern Jordan, where about 85,000
Syrians have found safety. And youth were excited to
meet with us for two reasons, one, to be able to practice English. They’re in an English class,
they don’t get a chance to practice conversational English often because they don’t have role
models and mentors there. Second, they wanted some guidance on where to find online
courses in digital literacy and social media marketing,
because some of them have set up small businesses in the camp, and they wanted to promote them. I share this to emphasize
that it is urgent for us to work together
to transform learning from one-size-fits-all place-and-time-constrained
learning, meaning classroom, to learning that is just in
time, that’s personalized, that is aligned with real-world
opportunities like work, and that is accessible for any of the youth
anywhere and any time. So to address this issue
of learning content being discoverable and
accessible to the young people, we’re creating a chat bot, which is an artificial
intelligence software that can simulate a conversation
or a chat with a end user using natural language
like texts and voice. Our youth collaborators in Lebanon, you see three of them here, have given this chat bot a persona of an older, wiser brother, I
guess that would be somebody they wanna take guidance from,
and they’ve named it Hakeem. Now, Hakeem is designed by NetHope and one of our members,
Norwegian Refugee Council, it’s a collaboration with Microsoft, a professor and a group of students at the University College Dublin and conflict-affected youth. Hakeem is enabling
young people to discover and access online learning
courses in English, in art, in engineering, and business, and be able to do that anywhere
anytime at their own pace. So whether it’s on the bus, at home after work or house chores, at a cafe that has Internet
connectivity, or in safe spaces and labs have been set up
by humanitarian agencies. What’s more is Hakeem’s library of courses that are sourced from many
different organizations and institutions, I think
some of them are here today, this library is tailored to the context in which the young people live. The library includes a number of courses in their native language, that’s Arabic. Many of the courses are available for free because young people cannot
afford to pay those fees. They’re downloadable offline, because connectivity can be an issue, and they’re aligned with their interests and with the local market opportunities around work and higher education. Now, this is a very simple example of AI, specifically AI capability, called natural language processing. And the reason why we chose to
use AI capabilities in Skype after looking at many other solutions, that even creating a website, as a repository of learning resources, is because AI can actually help us do a number of things better. For example, it can
help us extend the reach and augment the capacity
of humanitarian workers and local educators, and enable
us to provide equal support to all of the youth in
need, to young girls, to young people who live in remote areas. Also, chat bots like Hakeem
can provide an experience that is interactive and engaging, where young people,
through a conversation, can discover new learning content. And they’re already used
to chatting using Skype, and WhatsApp, and Facebook. And just like a learning companion, Hakeem can also notify young people when new courses are available that might align with their interest and reengage them in learning,
increasing the likelihood of them becoming lifelong learners. Now, I wanna leave you with two key points that really matter. One is, how do we design these solutions in a responsible and relevant way, and second, what does
it mean for educators, what do these solutions, what
does AI mean for educators? So, I believe that as designers, we have to take responsibility for the solutions we’re creating, because technology is never neutral, it is always representative
of our values, and our biases. And I wanna share with you a
couple of the characteristics of responsible innovation that we uncovered while working on Hakeem. For start, responsible,
relevant innovation starts by including all of the
diverse set of stakeholders whose values need to be
represented in that solution. So with Hakeem, that meant including, not just technologists, but also humanitarian workers, and youth. So in addition to inclusion of
diverse set of stakeholders, some of the other characteristics
of responsible innovation are transparency around
what is being built and why, why are we building certain features, and what are the value trade-offs? Ability to anticipate
possible consequences, who will be impacted if we
develop a solution like this, and how do we mitigate those risks? And then responsive design, that means having an
iterative process in place that allows for space for a debate, especially around conflicting values, and for the changes to be
made based on the feedback and we then make a lot of changes based on the feedback from the youth. So the point here is
really to be intentional about designing solutions,
including AI solutions, in a way that they are
transparent, they’re inclusive, they’re anticipatory,
and they’re responsive. Now, for the educators in the room, as somebody who had the
opportunity to teach, and really benefit from being a teacher, I see solutions like Hakeem not as a replacement for educators, but as a tool that can amplify our efforts and augment our work, as a
tool that can help us do more, be more productive, make better decisions, and free up our time to do the
work that actually matters, like focusing on the individual
needs of the learners. So with that, I want to invite you to join me in Microsoft
booth right after the keynote so we can explore how we can work together to transform education, to enable all of our youth to thrive. Thank you. (audience applauding) (“This is What You Came For” by Rihanna) – Thank you, Leila, thank you very much
for sharing your story, the work being done, and frankly, the work that
needs to continue to be done to help lift every student voice. I was really impressed
by the thoughtfulness on responsible innovation, the way in which they thought
through students’ reaction and emotions as they were interacting with the chat bot innovation Hakeem. And we’ve gotta do a better
job of finding the synthesis between students’ emotional
state and psychology, and the achievement that we
wanna drive in our classrooms. And to take us through this next section, I’d like to shift to
really bringing the power of social and emotional learning
and psychology together, and seeing technology’s
role to drive a difference. Please join me in
welcoming Barbara Holzapfel to take us to our next
part of the session. (“Work” by Rihanna) – Thank you, thank you. Hello, everyone. Thank you, Anthony, I’m super
excited to be here today, and I’m always energized to be at Bett, to see so many educators all
join together in one space, connecting with each other, learning from each
other, and sharing ideas. For the last two years, we’ve talked about the class of 2030, and life-ready learning,
and the evolving skillset that today’s students will need to thrive in work and in
life when they graduate, the importance of social
and emotional learning, and how technologies,
such as immersive learning and collaboration tools, and AI, can help the students acquire
these important skills. So as we enter this new decade,
we’re excited to explore the intersection of human emotions, and technology, and how they converge, and how the next generation of educators will use these technologies to empower the next
generation of students. Our next guest explores the intersection of psychology and computer science. He’s working to bridge the gap between human emotion and computer, he’s designing algorithm
for sensing human behavior, and developing technologies that can help understand mental health and improve online learning. Please join me in welcoming
Doctor Daniel McDuff. (“Army” by Ellie Goulding) – How many of you have experienced being overwhelmed at times as an educator, or have students that express
an ever-growing workload? I’m sure it’s not hard to think of times that that’s the case. With our to-do lists growing, and more and more things demanding
our attention and energy. “The most profound technologies
are those that disappear, “they weave themselves into
the fabric of everyday life, “until they become
indistinguishable from it.” This is a quote from Mark Weiser, the former head of the innovation
powerhouse at Xerox PARC, and it’s so true, the
internet, social media, they all fit with this description. But I think it’s missing
something, good technology, great educational technology,
should work for us, it should help us achieve
what we want to do. But so often, when we think of tech, we think of devices and
services that engage us, entertain us, but are
hungry for our attention, grabbing as much of it as possible. But shouldn’t technology empower us, shouldn’t it increase our productivity, even increase our overall
health and wellbeing? There are many teams across
Microsoft, including our own, working towards that goal, building speech and dialogue interfaces, gesture recognition, and
new forms of controllers, to make computing accessible
for as many people as possible, using AI to improve information search and document and knowledge creation, in order that when humans
collaborate with these models, it gives us almost superhuman powers to learn and create new things. And using augmented reality, embodied virtual agents and robotics, so that when we do
interface with technology, we can do it in the moment,
and not be glued to screens that disconnect us from other people. I want to give you one example of this, that we call focus agents. This is a digital personal
assistant that uses AI, and you can think about it in the context, for
instance, of lesson planning. It’s an agent that talks to a user at the beginning of the day, and asks them what they want to achieve, then using that information, it automatically schedules time for them to focus on those tasks. Later in the day, when the tasks approach, another dialogue is invoked, and helps the user ramp up for that task, discussing what specifically
they want to get done, and also how they’re
feeling about the task. At the end of the session,
it’ll also help them ramp down if they hadn’t finished
everything they wanted to, it can plan future sessions, or just talk to them about how they feel about that period of time. It also blocks distractions
and other things during the focus time to assist people in completing their objectives. What we noticed with this
device and technology, is that people will not
only become more productive, they’re able to focus for longer, but they also have reduced stress. Those tasks that they
use in their focus time no longer bleed into
their own personal life, and they have less anxiety
about forgetting things that they need to get done
and feel are really important. We’re building fully embodied
versions of these agents, all the way through to
traditional application-based UIs because we know that not
everyone is gonna want the same type of human-computer
interface in every context. Another way that AI can help us is in connection and collaboration. Effective groups, not only
achieve their objectives, but are also inclusive, they
encourage participation, and the quality and tone of
that interaction matters. We building tools that
leverage these AI models for understanding nonverbal behavior to help reveal some of
these unquantified dynamics that occur when we interact in groups, whether that’s in the
classroom, or remotely online. And by revealing this information, we’re not being prescriptive
about how people should behave, but potentially, we could reveal some of the unconscious biases that we have when we
interact with other people, or simply allow a group leader to make sure that everyone
has the opportunity to participate and give their opinion, when also managing a complex agenda and trying to get
everything done in a group. To summarize, AI and humans collaborating
with those systems has huge potential, but
what’s most important here is that these systems work for us, they help us achieve what we want to do, they don’t distract us
longer than we need to in order to get those things
done, and by doing so, they can even help improve
our overall health, our emotional wellbeing,
by relieving us of stress, and other types of things that come with all of the work that we need to do. Thank you very much. (audience applauding) (“Cheap Thrills” by Sia) – Thank you so much, Daniel. It’s incredible to see these
systems that can interpret and respond intelligently to human needs. I can see how these kinds of tools can really transform learning
and help the students and the teachers connect
in a deeply human way. Technologies like the ones that colleagues like
Daniel are working on, can enables students of all abilities to take ownership of
their learning journey, both inside and outside the classroom. Now, there are many factors driving some of the dramatic changes that we’re seeing in
education, be it migration, be it changes in economic circumstances, be it advances in technology, and, as we’ve seen through
our work in the Class of 2030, the evolving skillset that the students will
need as they graduate. So as we enter this new and exciting decade that’s ahead of us, we really wanted to examine
how all of these dynamics impact the profession of teaching. So we teamed up again with the
Economist Intelligence Unit, and embarked on a new project together called the Staff of 2030
and Life-Ready Teaching. As part of this, we reviewed
surveys and interview results from more than 3,000
students, 5,000 educators, and 85 subject matter experts
from all around the world. We also made sure that
1,000 of these educators came from a group whose
voice is often not heard. And are the pre-service
and early career teachers. What we learned overall was that this new generation
of teachers clearly understands the importance of prioritizing social and emotional learning,
of addressing global issues, and of using technology to solve some of the
really important problems. And so, as we examine
some of the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead
for the teaching profession, let’s look at some of the key facts and dynamics that are shaping them. We know that teaching as a profession is expected to grow, due
to population growth, migration, and many other factors. Teaching is also predicted
to be one of the professions least likely to be impacted by automation. So for all the teachers in the room, there’s no robot taking away your job. In fact, worldwide, there
already is a shortage of 69 million teachers,
and here in the U.K., a recent study found that about 40% of secondary school leaders already report a shortage
in qualified teachers. In addition, 2/3 of the
teachers leaving the profession are leaving for reasons
other than retirement. And to make matters really worse, while we know that about
70% of the job in 2030, will require technical skills, the early and career STEM
teachers who are so critical for helping the young generation be prepared for the digital economy, they’re leaving in the largest numbers. So clearly, there is a supply
and demand crisis going on in the teaching profession. So we wanted to better understand that and wanted to better understand
the teachers themselves, as well as some of the dynamics
of the teaching profession, both today, as well as tomorrow. First of all, there are
currently up to five generations working in the workforce at the same time, creating a very unique
generational dynamic. The two youngest generations, the Millennials and Generation
Z, will compose about 70% of the global workforce as we
move through this next decade, while the other previous three generations are also still in the workforce. On top of that, Generation Z, the youngest of these generations, is sitting in the K-12
classrooms as students, they’re sitting in higher
education institutions, preparing to be a teacher, and they’re already in the
staff room as teachers. And as Generation Z is the
largest generation ever, they will soon be in the staff
room in very large numbers. So this means that
teaching as a profession is becoming a lot younger. And these teachers are
incredibly values-driven and motivated by doing something that they consider
important or innovative. So these teachers are not human resources, they’re professionals with
aspirations and expectations. Most importantly, they
expect to drive change, they expect to drive change
by spending more time working on life skills, like
social and emotional skills, they expect to drive change by raising the students’ awareness, understanding and empathy
for global issues, and they expect to drive
change by using technology to create more personalized, inclusive and immersive learning experiences. Almost all the teachers that we spoke with expect their classrooms
to become more diverse. With that, they’re required to embrace teaching multicultural classrooms by applying inclusive
learning and teaching methods. But only 39% of them
feel adequately prepared to handle some of the challenges that this diversity can bring. 30% of teachers, across
48 countries, reported that they actually do
not feel prepared at all to handle the challenges of teaching a multicultural classroom. At the same time, this
generation is highly motivated, and tech-confident, but
they see some challenges when bringing these aspects together to drive impact in the students’ lives, as well as in society, more broadly. The causes for that are
largely time, training, and the pressure of expectation once they start teaching in the classroom. The pre-service teachers
clearly identified technology as critically important in the classroom. Even 60% of them look to apply technology to teach higher-order thinking skills. But, again, only about 38% of them feel that their teacher training had equipped them adequately to use technology
effectively in the classroom. So here there’s a really
important opportunity for educators to join some of the interactive
professional learning communities and apply collaboration tools via teams, or some of the video tools like Flipgrid, to keep their ongoing
training going and current. This young generation of
teachers that we spoke with were very clear in how
they see the top benefits of technology in the classroom. First of all, they reported that they think technology
enables more engaging and inclusive learning experiences. We saw from earlier
research that immersive and collaborative learning
experiences can help the students develop the social and emotional skills that are becoming so critical, as well as process information faster. Technology also allows them to
have self-directed learning. Voice and choice is incredibly important to this next generation, and AI power tools that
can help with reading and language skills, will allow
students of all abilities, and all aspects of diversity, to take ownership of
their educational journey, and for the teachers to
become an important mentor and guide on the way for them. And thirdly, technology
will prepare the students with the skills for a
tech-centric labor market. New future-ready skills
will cover the variety, from STEM skills to
emotional intelligence. And studies have shown that
students’ performance increases when technology is applied
properly in the classroom, and the experiences that the
students get in the classroom prepare them for the
real-world challenges. So these benefits can help the
students with self-directed, purposeful learning experiences, which is exactly what
the students told us, in the class of 2030 work, as the things that they’re looking for
in their education journey. The full research report
on the Staff of 2030 will be released in March, but the signals that we’re seeing are coming through loud and clear. The role of the teacher remains critical in building new future-ready skills, in reimagined learning environments. We expect that this
large, digitally native and purpose-driven generation will accelerate the transformation that we’re already seeing in education, and technology will transform learning, and it will drive the
aspirations of the Staff of 2030 to deliver the
student-centered experiences for the class of 2030,
and help the students and the teachers connect
in a deeply human way. So this transformation that
we are seeing in education and in the teaching profession,
it’s a human transformation, it is a transformation that
is powered by the convergence between machines and minds, between artificial
intelligence and human emotion. And undoubtedly, the class of
2030 needs the Staff of 2030 to unleash the full potential and help them change the world. There’s never been a better time to be a student or a teacher. Thank you. (audience applauding) ♪ That’s why they call
me Mister Fahrenheit ♪ ♪ I’m traveling at the speed of light ♪ ♪ I wanna make a supersonic woman of you ♪ ♪ Don’t stop me, don’t
stop me, don’t stop me ♪ ♪ Hey, hey, hey ♪ ♪ Don’t stop me, don’t
stop me, oh, oh, oh ♪ ♪ Don’t stop me, don’t stop me,
have a good time, good time ♪ ♪ Don’t stop me, don’t stop me ♪ ♪ I’m burnin’ through the sky, yeah ♪ ♪ Two hundred degrees ♪ ♪ That’s why they call
me Mister Fahrenheit ♪ ♪ Traveling at the speed of light ♪ ♪ I wanna make a supersonic man out of ♪

2 thoughts on “Microsoft Education BETT 2020 Keynote: Hybrid Intelligences – Amplifying Human Potential

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *