MSc One Health | Online Learning | The University of Edinburgh

MSc One Health | Online Learning | The University of Edinburgh


I’m Dr Sanath Keshava Muliya, I’m
a veterinarian by profession, I work as a wildlife health professional in India,
I work with wild animals so I have my Bachelors in Veterinary Medicine, and I
also have a Masters in Wildlife medicine. So definitely One Health has changed
a lot, my mindset especially, so I have now started appreciating
the interface issues where wild animals have been giving diseases to humans or
even sometimes humans to wild animals. And it has made, I mean the course
has made it much easier for me to understand the issues
which are involved, like appreciating the interface issues and
to identify the key factors which actually lead to disease
transmission among the interface actually. This course especially has made me
interact with a lot of people from other countries- that’s I think a key issue in
learning One Health aspects, One Health is an interdisciplinary issue, I do agree but
if it’s only in one particularly country, if you’re even involved in multiple
disciplines in your country, that might not give you a broader perspective on
what’s happening around the world. But One Health as an issue, as a stream
on its own, has to deal with all these issues- everything has to be involved-
you need to know what’s happening in some other countries so that you can
incorporate that to your country as well. Just as an example, India’s a huge
country, it’s a biodiverse country, but still to the date we don’t
have a One Health action plan. But when I started my course,
I came to know that Rwanda, which is much smaller but faces a similar
problem, already has a plan in place- so in future if India is going to come
up with a One Health plan I think I can definitely pitch in and
give more inputs to those action plans and make use of all this experience which
I’ve had in my One Health studies with Edinburgh and probably come up with
a good action plan for the country. I am currently working on a human-wildlife
conflict mitigation project, so it’s quite important to make people understand why it
is necessary to deal with such situations. Now if I can explain to the people that ok
it’s not only you encroaching their land and if animals are coming into contact
with you because of you encroaching their land, there is a possibility
of you getting infected as well, it’s not only the animals, you might
have health issues in future and there are recent examples in India like Nipah
virus which is drastically spreading, it’s just because of these encroachments. So I think this studies will definitely
help me to convey things in a layman language to the common people with whom
I work at the human-wildlife interface for sure. Discussion Boards have helped me a lot,
I thought One Health issues or emerging infectious diseases as such are
only issues in developing countries but I now know that it’s also an issue
in developed countries, so it might not be seen but
yes they do have those issues and we have to actually think
at that level as well. This understanding- definitely I wouldn’t
have got if I had not enrolled to these studies- so yes it has helped me a lot and I’m gaining a much broader perspective for
sure.
00:00:04,110 –>00:00:09,800
My name is a Adong Jennifer Oryema, I’m a
medical doctor by profession, from Uganda. I work with HIV care and
treatment and TB so it’s so obvious that it’s very
much related because TB’s so infectious, HIV is one of the leading
pandemics in the world and so I think I have chosen the best course. Because I used to be so haphazard in
my approaches, and now I know what to do when and how, and I think it
has realigned my thinking of health. I used to think health is just about
the human being and now I think I have a wider view of health, it has issues
concerning animals, environment and the human so it has opened up that that
space that I had had never been into. It was initially tough because you have
very many variation in profession and the like, but
I noticed that actually we have a lot of inter-connectivity in terms of
the environment, in terms of animals, in terms of health of humans, in terms
of like a lot of airspace to connect, but that is one thing that
had never occurred to me. So interacting with them has
positively moved towards interdisciplinary approaches
to many things. For me the amazing bit
is the teaching team, generally the people we’ve interacted
with have been so patient, the ambience is so good and I think this
is one of the things that has given me a push always to continue otherwise I
would have taken off a long time ago! Yes, so the teaching team, the Learn
teaching team that were helping us, they’re amazing.
00:00:03,500 –>00:00:10,000
My name is Salaviriuse Ahimbisibwe, I’m Ugandan and I’m a veterinarian I work with local government, in Bukedea district, I’m studying One Health Masters at the University of Edinburgh through online distance learning, supported by the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission. It is actually a challenge when you’re learning in an international environment, you get exposed to so many things, you get exposed to so many perceptions and you come to understand that actually the world is different, Uganda is different from Australia or South Africa or any other part of the world, and that has had a great impact on me in being able to understand the challenges of Uganda and knowing that these challenges have to be solved by us, not by someone from outside. For example, some of the key diseases, for example zoonotic diseases which we have here may not be a challenge in another world, so you cannot wait for someone in that world to come, that’s something I have really appreciated. and I know it has to be me, as a veterinarian, in a small sub-county where I work in Bukedea district, doing whatever I can do to make sure that people are ok, and I’ve already started putting what I learn into practice We organised one local conference where we invited the medical people within the sub-county, and the farmers, and we are able to share some of these challenges, so that they appreciate the kind of work that we do and why we do it using the concept of One Health. These things, we want farmers to understand them, it is not witchcraft, it is because of human activities that the world is changing, and until we take responsibility that it is our activities then there’s not much we can do, and that is why I did that, to make sure that where I work people understand that the environment has changed because of what we are doing, and therefore what we are doing can again reverse the changes. Doing an online course, initially I thought about it I’m like, eh? is it as good as doing full time, face to face, but over time I have appreciated it is as good, it is a great way to study, and I think more professionals should get interested in learning through online learning, the reason is you are able to continue working, offering a service in your community, as well as improving your technical capacity, improving your knowledge, that’s one too, in these countries of ours we have scarcity of professionals so if I was to say go to Scotland, to Edinburgh, for the next 3 years to do a masters course, there is a service which is lost in my community, but as I study, one, I’m able to put even what I’m studying into practice, two, I stay so the farmers are able to get to the service, as I also improve my own growth, as I also improve myself.
00:00:04,230 –>00:00:07,050
So I am Chizoba, I am Nigerian, and I work in the Institute of
Human Virology in Nigeria, and I’m a public health physician,
I have been for the past 7-8 years now. In the course of my studies I’ve come
to interact with a lot of students and I’ve come to understand that it’s
not really about that certification, it’s about what you bring to
the table,your experience counts too. Then what the Masters
programme has done for me, is that it has broadened my
horizon- I no longer look at a problem as my community problem but
as a global problem, so when it comes to solutions now I look
at what other countries have done and achieved this and
I try to mirror that in my own population, in my own locality -that
is one thing I have gained. Two, is that the community that
we have- our discussion group and all that- it helps us share ideas, so
even beyond maybe the topic of study, the friends I’ve made from our groups
actually discuss some things with them and they help me out. For me, communities vary and there’s not one formula that fits all. So if there’s anything I have
learnt from my Masters programme so far- which I’m already putting
up in my reflective work- is to ask why is there this
problem in this community. So I don’t just, like,
see numbers now because, you know, it’s the data that makes us going to
the community- so I don’t just look at the data now and then maybe start seeing
ok was it not populated well or what, no, I ask why is that data like that? Why is it that many women are choosing to
use the TBA [traditional birth attendance] services that’s traditionally better
attendance rather than assess prevention of mother to child transmission care
services that are readily available in the hospital settings. Is that because they don’t know enough,
is it because they are being, how do I put it,
stigmatized in the hospital, is it because they cannot afford
to pay that hospital fee, or is it because they choose anonymity or
is it because the society or the community they are in actually prevents them
from having access to those services? So I wouldn’t have asked these
questions if I wasn’t exposed to what I am exposed to currently in
my MPH platform so this actually, I think this is a major contributor
to what I currently do, and the funny thing is that in my
[work] programme people say oh, if you go with Dr G you’re
going to spend time, but the truth is that when I leave
a community or if I leave a facility, I leave there with an impact because
I didn’t just solve your problems, I taught you how to solve them yourselves. My name is Teniola Lawanson and
I’m from Nigeria. And I currently study for the Masters in
Global Health and Infectious Diseases. No doubt about it, it does change
the way I work very significantly, the degree has been challenging having
to combine working and studying but then the knowledge that I have gained for
the last 2 years as been tremendous. It has been immense but from the tutors
in the form of class lectures, self-directed learning, interaction with
course peers over online discussions and even for some of them they met
physically during Summer School, we exchange contacts and we keep in touch. And because we have a few of us that
work in the same field of work- so HIV programmes- so when I see something
interesting I’ll be like, ‘oh hi, whats up, I saw so-and-so case,
what do you think about it, are you having the same challenges back there, so how did
you approach it’- so you know it’s a means to actually network across the internet
without being physically present. Then of course the direct impact of some
of the courses has been very immense- and it does help to stimulate my appetite for further learning especially in
the field of infectious diseases. And also some of the optional courses,
for example, I took the course on Project Management Cycle and the course
was one of my most challenging courses but it ended up being one of the best courses
I took during my elective year, and it was splendid because it stays,
I’ve been doing it for a while but then because in a way you do things you
really don’t think about it but then when you do something that makes you realise,
ok probably you doing it this way, you could probably do it this way to
make it better so it was splendid, so yes it has been very much directly
impactful on my work so, yeah, it is. Back home where I come from
there’s this idea that online degrees are like online degrees and
basically it’s less work compared to the traditional
on campus degrees, I might not be able to get
it to use it to work, and the curriculum is not as good as
you have for on campus degrees. But I’m going to tell you that truth
is that all of that is a fallacy, the online degrees are very very good,
the curriculum is comparable to what you would have as traditional
on campus degrees. And the truth is it’s going
to develop your self-directed learning skills compared to if
you’re doing it on campus degrees, because you’re going to need to do a lot
of reading yourself, you’re going to need to do a lot of interactions- that
is part of what is even assessed. So it’s very very good and
of course if you’re going to enrol for an online degree it has to be something
that is going to be worth your time and it’s going to be worth your while, because it has to be something that you
are going to be really interested in. Plus it’s not going to be 1 year,
it’s going to be a minimum of 2 years and sometimes 3 years for some of
the programmes, that is if you’re doing the part time programme, not over 5 or
6 years, so definitely it has to be something you’re very interested in and
if you find yourself in that, just now to balance your time now to
balance it shared between studying, between working, and also between reading
at the same time so that you would be able to probably bring yourself to an optimal
level across these various faces. And of course on a side note,
if you have the opportunity to attend the Summer School please
do not shy away from it, it’s going to be very interesting, it’s
going to be an experience you’re going to very much enjoy, so, yes,
that is basically it. I taught you how to dig deeper and
how to engage the communities you’re serving more so
that you get the best out of them- so that’s what I got from
the MPH programme so far.

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