Next Generation Science Standards: Introduction to Three Dimensional Learning

Next Generation Science Standards: Introduction to Three Dimensional Learning


Introduction to three-dimensional
learning funds of knowledge and place-based science. How can we make symbols
for graphs for example? These videos show Melina Lozano’s first attempt to teach
the NGSS with her students. She is a new teacher but loves teaching science. I’m teaching at an elementary school in Madison, Wisconsin, and we’re in a second and third grade bilingual classroom. How did they get to this place of modeling and sense-making? How did Melina’s shifts take place? Melina already has a strong linkage with her students through connections with families, and with the student’s language and
culture. She is ready to start changing thinking about approaching science
teaching to support three-dimensional learning. Ok. Let’s do it! Three-dimensional learning
means that students use disciplinary core ideas, scientific practices, and
cross-cutting concepts to make sense of phenomena they experience in their environment. The three-week unit examines in detail
how water interacts with the land, and then how the land in turn interacts with
the water. We start with sort of just beginning understanding and beginning to make explanations with evidence, and then they use the model to sort of try to figure out if there’s a way that they can show what they understand. And in NGSS, that model becomes increasingly more sophisticated over time, so their
first interactions are more like they’re just discovering and thinking through
things, and then go they gradually start getting more and more information that
they can used to refine their model and revise their model, and they’re also
developing more complex language more scientific language. In the end they’re
going to be figuring out a way to stop the water from changing the land, so
they’re going to have an engineering solution, where they’re presented with
some kind of problem like a puddle underneath the swing, and they have to
figure out how to use the knowledge that they’ve collected to solve a problem. So
the end lesson can be sort of like an assessment, where you’re really seeing
what do the kids learn from this unit? In these videos you will see our
students participating in collaborative conversations and engaging in
three-dimensional learning, to make sense of phenomena they experience in their lives. What do students already need to know? It’s evidence because of the mud. It got wet when it was raining, and when people stepped on it, they left their foot prints. Your shoes make prints in the mud. Students will need to describe their background knowledge and experiences and use language to describe ideas and questions about rain events. We found a puddle. We found a puddle. It was over there, and it was wet. The biggest difference with NGSS, in general, is that it highlights the kind of place-based science as something that makes sense, because it means we can’t necessarily use the textbook as our number one source. And so we’re
going to go outside, and we’re going to get ideas from parents, and we’re going to get ideas
from the kids. Because we’re putting the kids in the center, a lot of kids who are not used to having their voice be a
powerful in the real world, suddenly become powerful in this classroom. This lesson had a component where the kids went home and asked their parents about
where they found evidence of rain, and that was done in their own language, their
home language, with their parents. And the point of that is to start that conversation at home also, and to make that the idea that they had at home really important and really essential
part of our meaning-making in the classroom. Wet mud is evidence! As the lessons progress, you will see that the students build ideas simultaneously as they acquire the science, or academic language. Both the
vocabulary needed to discuss the phenomenon, and the sense-making talk of building meaning collaboratively. They engage in the scientific practices of
gathering and using evidence to write claims, arguing from evidence, conducting an investigation, and modeling how rain changes some services and not others.
These practices–one dimension of the NGSS–combined with the cross-cutting
concepts of patterns and cause and effect, core science ideas of erosion, interactions between water and land, and rapid and slow changes that result from the interactions. What’s going to happen when you pour the water on it? What do you think? It’s going to turn over. Curriculum author, Emily Miller, team teaches with our classroom teacher Melina to implement the shifts required so as to
align with the NGSS. We agree, right? I’m going to draw it. Looks good to me. This is evidence. It’s wet here, and it rained. The students will collect evidence that the rain event occurred and work together to present claims with the evidence that we collect. We will move from informal language of speaking to formal language writing in
our claim. I think it rained because we saw footprints with mud. Is that evidence? Everyone give thumbs up, or thumbs down. Is that evidence that it snowed? Why are you saying ‘no?’ We ask the class a series of questions in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen their understanding about the evidence that it rained the night before. We start with an image of snow scene in a forest. We are informatively assessing the students capacities to use evidence, and to think about rain and snow to describe the evidence. Yeah … en espanol or como gustes? I don’t know how to explain it. Ok, how about in any language? I don’t know it. Watch how the students on the first day struggle to make themselves understood, to listen and make sense of each other, and to think about what their friends say. Did you find some evidence of rain? Our goal is not to start with seeing the young students as lacking skills and knowledge in scientific lenses, but so that we can set up activities that help us gather information the student knows and build
on it. In addition, we are looking to see what
skills the students bring to the discussion in terms of language, and also in terms of the academic discourse needed to exchange ideas. It’s like when something happens, like it rains or snows the next day you’ll see that the snow is on the ground and it rains, and the next day it is sunny, when you wake up, when you walk on the grass, it is wet. And you see mud puddles and puddles of water. The students will go outside and search for evidence that it rained. The fact that it rained in the neighborhood, a usual event, will spark the rest of the
unit. Students are asked to go home and talk about the evidence that it rained
at home, so they can bridge the home and community with the science they do at school. We will examine the idea of three-dimensional learning over the
course of this set of videos. What does it actually mean to teach in three dimensions? What does it look like? And what is easy and difficult about teaching this way? The NGSS mean that learning is
student-centered and the teacher access a guide, building on what students
understand. This is a shift in the role of teacher, and it is challenging for Melina. She doesn’t always feel effective Reflect on your own struggles with this
shift. How are you coaching students to use what they know and think in more
complex ways about the same idea

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