Online Learning Orientation Series – Episode_12: E-Learning Requires Work

Online Learning Orientation Series – Episode_12: E-Learning Requires Work


Welcome back to the Online Education Success
series of the Explorations Learning Network! Today is going to be a workout becuase I�m
going to exhaust your brain examining, Work in Online Classes. Hi, I’m Avi Anderson and this is the Explorations Learning Network [music] Whew! I am exhausted. [giggle] Despite what you may think, online classes
can require a bunch of work. Everybody learns differently, some people
learn best by reading information while others prefer to watch a presentation or listen to a speaker. These learning styles often require instructional
designers to create a variety of learning activities to accommodate everybody. In addition, most businesses require people
to work together so you can be sure that many of your online assignments will require you to work in a learning team. Because you�re working in teams and discussing
issues in groups, you can plan on participating in activities that are often referred to as ice-breakers. Ice-breakers can be fun ways for you to introduce
yourself to your instructor and other students. These activities can also help the instructor
understand what you want to get out of the class. On top of being engaged through different
learning styles, participating in team activities and getting to know each other in ice-breakers, your online class is also going to require
you to conduct research, write papers, make presentations, take quizzes, solve puzzles, play games, take exams, read papers, make forum posts, read ebooks, participate in debates, create portfolios, watch videos, read forum posts, and tons of other things. Let�s look at some of these in more detail. In order to help you understand a topic in
greater detail, instructors typically like to have students look at subjects from another
perspective. They�ll use activities such as role-playing
and debates, requiring students to research information
in order to present an opposing view on a topic. Before you can formulate a debate, write a
paper, make a forum post, or create a presentation, you�re going to need to conduct research. Thanks to the Internet, it�s easier to conduct
research today because you can visit almost any library, museum, or government archive, anywhere in
the world, simply by going there online. Before you can find information, you�re
going to need to learn how to properly conduct research. You�ll need to learn how to narrow searches
by using keywords and phrases. Chances are you won�t be using online encyclopedias
like Wikipedia or search engines such as Google or Bing as reliable resources. These are great resources for everyday types
of information. However, they don�t provide the detail or
scholarly evidence necessary to support an idea. You�ll also need to learn the difference
between information that is based upon opinion verses information that is of a scholarly nature. Information that has been researched and supported
by other scholars is more valid than opinions. In most cases the evidence you present in
your papers and presentations must be based upon the academic research of other people. Your research will require you to search an online library for books, articles,
and peer-reviewed papers; Read the information from the material you�ve
collected; Select which portion of the information you
want to use in your assignment; and cite the source of the information. Once you�ve finished conducting your research,
you�re going to need to write your paper or create your presentation. You may need to search for images, create
charts, or draw diagrams, activities requiring more time and more work. Once your assignment is complete, you�ll
want to have someone proofread it for any errors. Many colleges and universities use online
software that electronically reviews your work and points out spelling, grammatical, and
reference errors. After the proofreading is completed you�ll
need to correct those errors and in most cases re-submit the paper for
a second proofreading. Once you�re confident that the paper is
error free, you have to get online and hand it in. Remember, all of this has to be completed
before the assignment due date. I admit that it sounds like a whole bunch
of work, and it is. But remember that once you�ve got it done
you�ll know more about that topic than you did when you started. The Explorations Learning Network is a production
of Clark College and is sponsored through generous donations
and the support of students and faculty Mark Gaither is our producer and director
and this episode was sponsored by a Department of Labor grant administered by
the Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board The Workforce Training and Education Coordinating
Board is a partnership of labor, business, and government dedicated
to helping Washington residents obtain and succeed in family wage jobs while meeting
employers needs for skilled workers. I’m Aviance Anderson for the Explorations
Learning Network. Advancing Learning for the Information Age.

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