Recruiting grad students for Trellis Fund fellowships

Recruiting grad students for Trellis Fund fellowships


In the fall of 2017
our team will begin recruiting graduate students to work on 15 new Trellis Fund
projects in Africa and Asia. The Trellis Fund is a capacity building and grant
making program led by the Horticulture Innovation Lab at the University of
California, Davis, in partnership with North Carolina State, the University of
Florida and the University of Hawaii at Manoa. This year’s winning organizations
will receive a four thousand dollar grant to implement projects with the
farmers they work with. Each Trellis Fund project connects a graduate student from
one of our partner universities with an organization in a developing country to
work on a horticultural project. The student’s role as a Trellis fellow is to
support the organization and the project with agricultural expertise, working with
farmers on issues along the horticultural value chain from nutrition
and marketing to post-harvest handling. Each fellow will travel internationally
for about two weeks of field work this year to either Ethiopia, Ghana, Nepal,
Rwanda, Tanzania or Uganda. There’s a lot of flexibility within the Trellis Fund
that typically allows fellows to travel during a time that’s convenient for
their academic schedule, including over the summer. In addition to traveling
fellows will be required to complete 100 hours of remote consulting work in
support of their host organization fellows will also participate in a
10-week seminar online from January to March to better prepare for working in
international development. This seminar will include topics ranging from survey
design to monitoring and evaluation and is designed to provide students with
practical knowledge that they can apply directly to their project. Trellis
projects typically last six months, but depending upon availability fellows
could extend their consulting work to a whole year. We’ve had both masters and
PhD students use Trellis as a valuable opportunity to gain hands-on experience
in consulting and international travel while contributing to their research or
serving as the basis of a capstone project. We hope that a Trellis project will really broaden the horizons in career
and exploration for the fellows, exposing them to new experiences–both the
challenges and rewards of international development. This year we have 15 Trellis Fund
projects. You could work on the promotion of mulching technology in Tanzania,
you could train farmers on post harvest and value addition of mangoes in Ghana
or you could advise on the horticultural production in agribusiness
marketing of kiwi fruit in Nepal. These are just a few examples of this year’s
Trellis Fund opportunities… My name is Tia Silvasy and I’m a master’s student
at the University of Hawaii in Manoa and I was a Trellis Fund participant this
year and worked on a project with CARD- Nepal. So I had a great time on my
fellows experience and I wanted to share a little bit about my experiences
with other people that were interested. Hey it’s Tia here and I’m here with CARD-Nepal and we’re doing soil testing workshop on this farm with the guys from
the Eco Minions… Being able to go to a third world country and
get real hands-on experience in farming was a great learning experience for me. Some things are the same no matter where you go around the world: There’s always
pests and diseases. But some things are different.Like in Nepal they were
farming with no soil testing. That’s a standard practice we do here in
the U.S. Everybody was interested to you know
learn what kind of work I was doing and how I was helping out there. One of the
questions that I was wondering is: How is this really going to impact
you know the people involved, like what can I bring to the table and I’ve always
had a very service-oriented attitude towards helping people and teaching
others and after I got to Nepal I realized I
did have a place; I did have a role. and I made a very meaningful impact on the people there. So
besides gaining practical skills what are some of the other benefits of being
a trellis fund fellow? Fellows will be provided with funding to cover all
airfare. They will also be reimbursed for all expenses around visas, vaccines, food
and accommodation, and upon successful completion of their project they’ll
receive a three hundred dollar fellowship. Students are welcome to apply
for up to three Trellis projects. You will be able to review this year’s
available Trellis Fund project on September 5th when our application
officially opens. Graduate students who are attending one of our four partner
universities are eligible to apply. To apply, you should submit your resume and
a brief cover letter explaining your interest in the project and how it
relates to your agricultural experiences so far. All of this information will be
available on the Horticulture Innovation Lab web page.
We look forward to receiving your applications and for more information
you can visit our website or contact us via email at [email protected] Funding for the Horticulture Innovation Lab comes from the US Agency
for International Development as part of the US government’s global hunger and
food security initiative Feed the Future

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