Robots & Legos: Educational Technology and STEM in the Classroom

Robots & Legos: Educational Technology and STEM in the Classroom


We don’t just treat things as separate
disciplines. It’s not just math, it’s not just science, or just using technology by
itself to type on a computer. You take all those things and you bring them
together in the real world. So, we’re asking students to think like an
engineer. Think like an astronaut. [to students: “How are we gonna make it make a sound or do something?”] I think the thing that we don’t value enough right now is that engineering can begin at the elementary school. If we start teaching at the
elementary level, and we build in the arts and the—you know, creativity into it, we
can start to appeal to girls as well. If we can build in the right things in the
right age, girls start to see themselves as engineers. Students are
going to college, and students are coming out of college, and we’re not filling
those high-end engineering positions because we’re not preparing them to do
those types of jobs. One of the big pushes, though, right now is the science
standards that are coming out and those take a very integrated approach with the
science and the math and the engineering. I think STEM education is extremely
important in the classroom because it’s relevant to what real-world engineers
and real-world scientists do. When I received the Presidential Award for
Excellence in Science Teaching, it was kind of a surreal moment. I think, you
know, I sometimes, I think I teach a little too outside of the box, but I think the
fact that it was a STEM lesson that I’ve submitted, probably is relevant to what’s
going on right now. I studied in the educational technology program at Lesley
University and I teach here in Pelham Elementary School, I teach in Richmond.
And I hope teachers integrate technology.

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