STEAM Education Program Overview

STEAM Education Program Overview


– STEAM is an educational framework that brings reality into the classroom. It connects the different
subjects together in the way that they would relate to the business world and to each other. – [Girl] S is for Science,
T is for Technology, E is for Engineering, and A is for Arts, and M is for Math. – So it’s science and technology interpreted through
engineering and the arts, all based in the language of mathematics. It connects the different
subjects together in the way that they would
relate to each other. – I like it because you
get to think and create. – But you have to see it in action, you have to see the
students do what they do. They think with their hands. It’s a grand opportunity, it’s just creating those
21st century skills that our students need. So, that’s why we gear STEAM
toward for our students. – We love STEAM! (cheering) – [Natalie] We came up
with an idea we saw online about how some students have
been building arcade games, strictly using cardboard boxes and tape. And so they’re having
to be very innovative and trying to figure out different ways to make things using those materials only. What could we do to keep
these up a little more? – [Male Student] We could just get… – [Female Student] We could
put some cardboard underneath? – [Natalie] Yeah, so
why don’t we prop it up with some cardboard. That’s a great idea. – I wanna be an arcade
designer when I grow up. – [Natalie] They’ve had a good time; they’ve been extremely
engaged and it’s been a great problem solving activity,
where they have to figure out alternative ways to make things. – [Dana] It’s just so great
for the kids to be creative and use their imagination and see how arts can be involved in engineering and math and all these other careers. – We love art! – [Georgette] The Arts
include the social arts, the manual arts, the physical
arts, and the fine arts. – [Brian] To be a
successful STEAM program, you realize that integration is the key. Meaning that from classroom to classroom, these concepts have to
carry on to each other, have to tie into each other for things to really
relate and to make sense. That’s how you’re gonna
reach every student, you’re gonna reach every type of learner when things are integrated
and fully connected. – Right now, you’re going
to balance this butterfly on the end of this pencil. – A pencil is a simple machine. (giggling) – [Tonya] So we started out small, with just small things
that you have to balance. And they get to go, when
they go to P.E. one day, they’ll get to make
structures using their bodies and they have to balance. But what we’re working up to
as our culminating activity we’re going to the
Space and Rocket Center. So before we get to go there, we’re gonna actually make
rockets and launch them. And everything that we do,
we always write about it. I need you to write three
sentences about balance. – [Georgette] I developed STEAM in 2006, while I was a graduate student. I started using it in 2007
and I’ve kind of worked the kinks out of it myself in the classroom for the few years. So, I started doing
trainings on it in 2008. So, when schools come to me
and they want their teachers to be trained in STEAM, what
they’re really looking for is for me to help them
make that mental shift. To start taking their curriculum
and expand it to be STEAM. – [Brian] We thought
we knew what STEAM was, but until you really train and have Georgette to show you how these disciplines are really related, how mathematics is the
through line of life, what technology really means,
that it’s just the tools that you’re using and how we can relate all these things together. – Georgette Yakman was so
phenomenal because she gave us a wealth and plethora of
knowledge that we needed to actually branch our STEM school. – The most important thing for me was connecting students with careers that were based on STEAM. – So, I wanna stay in school and learn more about
engineering and robots, so I can be an engineer when I grow up. – I want to be an engineer, too. – Make the world a better place. – People ask me all the time, “What’s a good way to teach STEAM?” And I use the game of GO. It’s left and right brain
developed, it’s artistic, it’s mathematical, it’s the
Asian equivalent of chess. – It’s a paradigm shift. It’s opening your eyes to a
different way of doing it. And once you’ve seen that, you realize that this is the way to go. – They have to be able
to see it, taste it, use their senses to learn and then they don’t forget, you know. – This is just good teaching,
this is project based, children getting dirty with their hands and creating these objects for them, and that’s the real winners
in all this is the students. – Full STEAM ahead! (cheering)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *