Teaching Special Education Online During COVID-19

Teaching Special Education Online During COVID-19


Turn it over to CEC’s executive director
Chad Rummel. Hi everyone my name is Chad I’m the executive director of CEC and I’m
pleased to welcome so many of you here today to see so many of our practitioners
participating and adding one more tool to your toolbox. The special education
community is constantly being asked to be adaptive in everything you do and
this last week and the weeks leading up to today have taken that adaptation and
stretch it farther than any of us have ever experienced your ability to keep
adapting and working to serve our students I want to thank you. The steps
ahead of us are very unchartered in many ways but we must do it together
if you want to see a return to normalcy or to our new normal whatever that looks
like CEC will be poised to lead you as we enter that stage as well. For those of
you just joining us welcome to the CEC webinar Teaching Special Education
Online During COVID-19. I’m pleased to introduce today’s presenters dr. Kelly
Grillo and Jeremy Glauser. Jeremy is the founder of eLuma the leading provider
of teletherapy for K-12 schools and districts and Kelly is an award-winning
educator and expert provider of online instruction and CEC’s 2020 Teacher of
the Year. Based on the many questions being shared in our all member for him
in the last few weeks we asked Kelly and Jeremy to come together to provide us
with strategies to help you take your teaching online and the’ve spent countless hours over the last three days putting together today’s presentation so I’ll
now turn it over to Kelly and Jeremy to get us started. you>>KELLY:Hello everyone we’re happy to be here so we’re gonna start off with just a little overview of teaching online during COVID.
Jeremy is gonna take us through the first two portions of our slide deck
today all of the materials that we talked about will be provided to you
before the end of the webinar and will continue to push these things out
through our networks we truly appreciate everybody’s collaboration we also
appreciate all the teachers that took countless time contributing today’s
material we’ve done a lot via distance tools I’ve been telling some of these
tools have been slightly imperfect because of the mad demand that we’re
putting on some of these systems so as we learn together, we ask for everybody
to please be patient and know that you all are feeling the same stress that we’ve felt over the last three days and so the biggest message is that you’re not
alone and we’re in this together you
you>>JEREMY: Well I’m gonna go ahead and get us started here and we will jump in and talk about many great things thank you
so much Dr. Grillo it’s been a pleasure to work with you and so many experts who
are trying their hardest and who are all working to provide best practices in
this very difficult time and as we’re facing this unprecedented coronavirus
and school closures so these are some of the learning objectives that we will
want to cover today. So by the end of the webinar we hope that you will be able to
identify the necessary tools and strategies for online instruction. We
hope that you will be able to adapt to adapt traditional in classroom lessons
to meaningful online instruction develop a strategy to monitor learning goals and
the last one here create a process to effectively manage online instruction. So
as Dr. Grillo said I’ll be going through those first two parts. Let’s jump to part
1, let’s get ready. You know schools are clamoring for solutions and we’re all
striving to figure out how to move our students online over the past week and
we have evaluated every angle from services to tech support to every
different strategy that we can come up with to do online instruction. Many
schools have have mitigation plans to help them go online. Our position is that
the last thing admins and their teachers need right now is to sign a contract to
retool hundred percent and implement a whole new technology stack district-wide. We believe educators need to focus on
what they’re familiar with and get up and running with with what they have
during these short term closures be patient with yourself everyone’s in the
same boat. So let’s go ahead and jump into these different pieces of getting
set up. The first thing that we want to talk
about is technology. There are some key resources that you’ll need to have to
ensure great success. The first is a working laptop and a webcam, if you have
an iPad or a tablet do as best you can with what you have. A headset is really
good it helps with high quality audio and communication when you’re working
online through a video conferencing platform and then you’ll want to make
sure you’ve got a high-speed internet connection. Now be patient with yourself
this might take some getting used to and adapting to but these are the key
resources that you will need when you’re getting set up with technology for the
first time. The other piece that you’ll need is access to a HIPPA compliant
video conferencing software. Zoom is an incredibly dependable solution and is
offering a free basic account for k-12 educators, this is amazing. So in our
resources on the follow up you’ll want to go fill out the form and then get
free access to that so we’ll make sure you’ve got the link and the information
to do so. The next thing that you want to take account for here is your workspace. Now your workspace is going to look different for everyone.
When we’re going home and we’re, we’ve got our spouse or our partner working
from home we might be trying to figure out creative spaces to work. You might
have your kids with you, you might be like my wife and myself and
our three kids where they’re working from home. Do your best try and find a
quiet space as possible. Lighting is best when it’s coming from a window or a
natural source towards your face and make sure to try to eliminate
unnecessary distractions behind you. If you have an appropriately sized desk and
chair you’ll, you’ll really be thankful because you’ll probably be sitting more
than you’re used to and you’ll want to make sure that you’re comfortable that
way. And for many educators working online you’ll you’ll want to make sure
that if you have a second computer monitor to plug into your laptop or your
computer, it makes it easy to have multiple things
up at once as well as a keyboard and a mouse, those things make navigating and
collaborating easier and is better on your body. Now the last thing I really
want to focus on with the setup is your own self-care, right? Let’s be good to
ourselves. We’re all going through this for the first time, well many of you are,
and others at home are. These kids are going through it for the first time. So
dress professionally. Make sure you create a schedule so that you can stick
to something that gives you dependability and routine and we’ll talk
more about that in a minute. It is cold when you’re sitting down a
lot, your blood might not flow as well as if you’re up and moving in a physical
building, so blanket or warm socks are definitely a plus.
Get up every so often move your body get the blood flowing. There’s a really good
20-20-20 rule, look 20 feet away every 20 minutes for 20 seconds. Your eyes are
probably not quite as used to looking at a computer that close to your face that
much during the day. And of course part of our good self-care is patience. Like I
said and like Dr. Grillo said we’ve got a lot of kids who are doing this for the
first time, parents who are both at home now. There are going to be an array of
difficult situations and just know everyone’s in this situation. If your
child pops in behind the camera, introduce them! I had that happen to me
just the other day, just, just pray that your kids are fully dressed unlike my
kids at that moment. But you know what we’re all trying our very best we’re all
trying to get kids educated and help our students progress. The next
thing that we want to take a look at in getting ready is our communication
planning. And this is really critical for us as part of self-care but also just as
part of educators. I’m going to show you a sample routine for AM and PM
schedules because it is very different. It might be obvious to
many of us that we have to create a different routine if we’re working from
home but still the nuances can be challenging and we need to set our own
selves up for success. So let’s take a look at Mr. Smith who’s a first-grade
special education teacher and his sample daily routine. In the AM Mr. Smith is going
to, I’m gonna get up I’m going to exercise, do my mindfulness activities,
take a shower. I’m going to eat, drink my coffee, hydrate myself and then newsflash,
I’ve got a real world moment here. I’ve got to wrangle my own kids and get them
going and that’s okay. Review of schedule, announcements and
objectives for the day and then get that out to our families.
You’ll probably get into a cadence where you make phone calls to families, where
you’ll have video calls or you’ll exchange emails and, and even message
through your favorite app like Edmodo or Classdojo or maybe many of you use
Remind. and getting into this rhythm of checking in each day might be realistic
if you have a smaller caseload but if you have a larger caseload, be realistic
with yourself, it might be every few days or at least weekly. And then make
personal connections. It’s very different when you’re working online and you’re
not physically in the building. Those personal connections are going to be
more intentional. So we recommend video office hours or making sure that you
have video meetings with your colleagues and that you’re collaborating regularly
through phone, video and other modes of making personal connections. Now at
midday I’ve got to check in, I’m doing my lunch bunch,
I’m getting up I’m walking around I’m getting outside for a few minutes.
I’m hydrating myself and then another real moment pops in. I’ve got to keep my
own kiddos entertained I’ve got to focus on their learning as well. And then I’ll
check and connect with my families, my students. I post some success stories,
some pictures, maybe even a recording of myself and post it out to my families
and connect with them. And of course I want to remember to do my AM formative
assessments and logins and metric data so I can get that documented
while it’s on my mind. One of the things that we often don’t realize when we go
online is that documentation, even though it’s critical when we we educate in
person, it becomes more critical when we’re working remote, so that we can go
back and remind ourselves about these interactions and keep track of student
progress. So in the PM I’m going to look at and and write out my parent
notes on the message board. And then another real-world moment. Now if you’re
like me, I love my kids dearly, but we’re gonna be working at home and we might
not be used to that. And our kids, as much as we love them, we might need to lock
them in their room sometime. No, I’m just joking, please don’t really do that
but you get my point. Focus on homework and study
skills, planner checks. Message your colleagues and collaborate on video,
video or Zoom calls. Now it might sound silly but have a coffee talk over video
on Zoom or do a check in, collaborate. You do still need to have that adult
time, you still do need to make sure and reach out and collaborate with your
colleagues and your administrators and your staff. So make sure at the end of
all that you’re doing some of those formative assessments, you’re logging
your data and you’re keeping track of what you’re doing. Now let’s move on to
the third part of this first section and talk about how to get ourselves and our
students online for the first time. Now that we’ve got our technology, our
software, our work space and we have a communication plan and routine in place,
we want to focus on getting ourselves and students online. So communication
with our students while working with them from a distance is critical. Don’t
underestimate the need to over communicate by phone or email.
And so if we look at these five tips I want to focus in on what it means for
you to get your students online. So create a schedule for both you and your
students and so that you and your students and your families can see.
That’s an important component so that people know what to anticipate, and
you’ll rely on that. You’ll send out reminders. And in those reminders make sure
to include a Zoom link, make sure to include some instructions that I’ll
review here on this next slide. Prepare your materials ahead of time if you can,
but again do your very best it might take some time as you learn this new
modality. And when you’re online looking for materials can be distracting or can
disengage the students that you’re with which is why eventually as you become
more adept to this modality you’ll want to have preparation ahead of time and be
ready to rock and roll. Document thoroughly and make sure that you are
are logging all those notes and that data during or after the session,
whatever your preference is, and then send some of the follow-up activities,
reminders and upcoming events. You might feel like you’re sending a lot of those
messages out to the families, right, but in reality it’s it’s really about over
communicating. When you’re moving online it might feel like you’re, communi,
you’re over communicating but I promise you you’ll need to do that otherwise
things will and may get lost in the shuffle. So on this next slide I want to
talk about what your students need to know and this is a good resource for you
because you can literally copy and paste this into a calendar invite. If you’re
using an existing tool or you’re using a new tool, you can copy and paste some of
these instructions into the calendar invite. Kelly, if you could go to the next
slide I want to show a few of the resources here that you’ve got. So they
need to have, the family needs to have the same kind of quiet space, again as practically as
possible, a working computer, a high-speed internet connection, a webcam and a
headset. And then in your invite or in your instructions, include your link to
Zoom and they click on it and it will automatically open up that application.
Be patient with your families they may need to do it on their phone if they
don’t have a great internet connection. We have families of all different
socioeconomic statuses, rural versus urban, access to technology and not.
I have seen a lot of schools who are checking out Chromebooks and are
offering other creative solutions like that, but at the end of the day what
we’re trying to do is provide the best services that we can to these kids and
help their education continue without regression. And so that last piece you
might need to understand how to allow their microphone or help them allow
their microphone and audio and camera in Zoom for the first time. So these are a
few really technical tips that you can copy-and-paste, you’re welcome to reuse
and repurpose yourself. Now I want to move on to the second part of this
webinar and after the second part I’ll hand it off to our friend Dr. Kelly
Grillo and there are some really good teaching strategies that you can apply
to online instruction. I will go through eight really really solid teaching
strategies that you can adapt for online delivery so let’s get set. The first one
is to engage with your students. Engaging students online is different from
engaging your students with your physical presence in a classroom. Now if
you’re like my daughter many years ago and are engaged by some snow stuck on a
glass window, it’s pretty obvious to know that she’s engaged. She’s participating
you can see her body reactions and you can see her body language. So I encourage
you to use your expressiveness, be enthusiastic, with your body language,
with your tone of voice. Some of those intangibles don’t come through quite as
clearly as if you were physically in the same classroom. It’s important to have
your materials prepared beforehand and it’s important to have grace and
patience for you and for your students. We’re all experiencing this these school
closures for the first time as a result of novel coronavirus, so establishing
your presence will signal to your students that you’re visible, that you’re
available and you’ll be welcoming them to a new online learning environment. Remember they might be nervous too, so enthusiasm and tone of voice can ease
their stress. Now the second teaching strategy is setting clear expectations,
and this is very much tied in to your own setup your routine, how you
communicate through email, phone ,video conferencing, messaging boards and if
you’re like this teacher, you might be surprised if the expectations are not
clear. This child obviously interpreted writing the largest number you can not
as the largest digit in infinity, but taking the number one and making it
really tall. You know it’s okay to laugh, it’s okay to see the humor in some of
this, but then reset expectations, redirect and help your students self
assess. The third strategy that we want to go over today is creating a
supportive online learning environment and getting personal. So many of you use
this Remind or Edmodo or Classdojo application for communicating. If you
don’t it is just fine, our purpose here is not to tell you exactly how to run an
online session or class, it’s to give you strategies that you can implement with
existing tools you’re already familiar with. So this is one example in this case
the teacher by the name of Amy uses Flipgrid to post a video and connect
with her families. That creates a supportive environment.
It creates visibility to you as a teacher or a therapist and it develops
that really good relationship that you need to have a responsive educational
experience for these kiddos. The fourth strategy that we want to go over here is
fostering personal relationships and remember to have fun. As I was preparing
for this webinar the past couple of days I reached out to our team who serves
many many kids around the country and I said, you know, what what do you do or
what is an experience you’ve had that fits this and I was so inspired by Lacey.
Lacey is an incredible speech and language pathologist and this is her
story, I’m gonna read it to you here. “The absolute most precious thing happened in
my session this morning. I was finally able to get two of my students lined
together in session. I have known that they would do well together because they
are equally just so kind and have incredible attitudes. Both have autism so
the conversation needed some facilitation.During our chat it comes
out that these students live in the same town, 4 minutes from each other! I got to
watch these two incredibly sweet teenagers and exchange phone numbers
and plan to meet up at the park eventually. This is so significant.”
As you conduct individual or group class and therapy sessions, you might have some
really impactful experiences like this and if you’re like me this is what makes
it worth it. The fifth strategy is use a mix of tools readily available to you.
Now I’ve mentioned this a time or two but this is a really important one for
you, because it does not require a lot of retooling. This is not the time to retool
100%, it’s the time to do it incrementally. We encourage you as a best
practice to make sure you look at what you’ve got and start from there. Don’t
stress out too much, take a baseline and build from that. Kelly if you can go to
our next slide, I want to point out some of the resources that are free and we’re
going to provide a full comprehensive list of free resources that you can take
advantage of. So many companies have graciously offered their their things
for free. So TED-ed has a lot of free materials, built out lesson plans.
Scholastic has a lot of really great free materials. I personally am a fan of
News to You they’ve got a lot of really great free materials, and then you can
also use things like Google Forms, that’s a, Google has a wonderful set of tools
and this one in particular Google Forms allows you to gather insight before a
session. So Kelly if you can switch us to that next slide I’ll give you an example
of a teacher who is using Google Forms to do check-ins. So in the morning or
afternoon, Miss Venturino will go ahead and send this form to the students
who will fill out the survey and it gives Miss Venturino some great
insight into that student. This can also be used as a way for student
feedback, self grading, self assessing. The next strategy is breakout rooms. Zoom has
a really great option to do breakout rooms. Your students can engage
one-on-one to answer questions, they can engage in small groups to do research
projects and then you as an educator can close those breakout rooms and bring
everyone back to the main video room. We’ll have some more information in the
follow-up handouts. In the next strategy, number seven, we want to focus on
breaking learning into smaller chunks and patterns of activity and being in an
online setting, you have a little bit more flexibility, just because we’re able
to reach students where they are. And there are so many different philosophies
on pedagogy, this is not the end-all be-all, you might have things that you
believe in more strongly personally, but prepare, teach, apply and reflect. And if
you can chunk these out into smaller pieces that can help you as a as an
educator transition online, take smaller chunks and, and prepare in between those
teaching opportunities. And then the last strategy is to make sure that we’re
soliciting strong feedback. So in the end feedback what we of course if we don’t
have the feedback from the teacher to student or from student to teacher then
we’re not able to prepare, reflect, prepare, and instruct personalized
learning to that student. So make sure that you take those opportunities with
Google Forms or other means to solicit their self grading, their self assessing
in addition to you providing reinforcement of positive behaviors and
redirection. Again these are some strategies that hopefully will help you
get up and running. It’s not much, much of it’s probably not new to you but it will help
you to realize that you are in a very good spot, there are just some things
that you need to to do in order to transition online. And at this time I’m
going to hand it over to my friend and colleague Dr. Grillo.>>KELLY: Thank you Jeremy. So part three of this
webinar is gonna take a look at when we actually go. We’re gonna go get started
with getting ourselves online, and we’re gonna take a look at some very useful
and practical examples when you’re preparing for the webinar the 6,000 plus
folks that signed up shared that they wanted out-of-the-box and tried-and-true
solutions that would bring them a lot of success without a whole lot of stress,
and quite frankly a lot of tears, so we’re going to take a look at what tools
might exist that model best practices so that any, we’re not spending a lot of our
time fumbling through the tools and we’re really spending the most or the
majority of our time making those deep connections that Jeremy shared, so that
we can truly support our students. Um so this is what the cycle of online
high-impact instruction looks like. So if you think of any quality lesson plan,
we’ve always started with like that backwards design: writing the learning
outcomes, and also making sure that those learning outcomes are aligning to the
things in which we’re looking to assess. So when we do that we then can pick a
selection of opportunities for our students to have experiences, whether
these things are low-tech or high-tech, or a selection of things that they get
to choose because they know they’re learning best, but then we sequence those
opportunities in a way that’s meaningful and we write very clear instructions. And
so when I think very clear, we want to make sure that we’re looking over those
instructions and they are clear and direct sentences. That they do not go on
and on and on and on. Maybe that we’re using sequencing things
like “get ready, get set, go” like we are modeling in the webinar today, and that
those sequencing opportunities kind of fit the same patterns, so that our
students who really do have executive functioning needs
or they have organizational needs in their IEP, that they are able to wrap
their minds around the sequencing of how online instruction is going to look week
to week, as this might be something that we’re doing for the remainder of the
school year. At the very end of this when we write those clear instructions, we
want to think about those students that might come print needs or print
disabilities so a lot of our online tools have the ability for us to do a
voiceover where we can record our own voices going over step-by-step those
same instructions and need for everybody to really think and reflect that we may
have students that we teach that come from homes much like my own home my
mother was illiterate also a person with a learning disability and she with a
non-reader so if we make the assumption that we have to use tools to help
support our students because they might also be at home with parents who may not
be at the thing print we will do a better job overall
supporting our students and there’s tools that help us to do that pretty
easily this is just a quick glance of a real lesson plan because we want you
guys to think of what are you already doing so this lesson plan and I provide
this link in our resources this lesson plan starts with my standards and what I
need the kids to know and I always target on spiraling standards the
remainder of this lesson plan has different tools that I’ve embedded that
I had used with my students let’s say prior to extending online learning or at
home learning or distance learning so I’ve used things in my classroom like
Quizlet to spiral and look at language options I knew things in my classroom
like the amoeba sisters online so I would continue to use those same tools
because my students find fluency while we were together using those tools we
don’t want to overwhelm our students or ourselves so if you’re using a selection
of tools you should continue to try to beat those tools in
because our students are fluent using those tools here’s an example I
mentioned amoeba sisters let’s say Jeff did not have a platform to run my
materials on even though we use these materials in class let’s say we were
sort of low tech and I had a QR code that took students directly to this
video in my classroom and so if that was the case that we were doing centers and
kids were rotating through live in my brick and mortar building then to the
ninth way using TED-ed you can create a free account you can put your same you
know activation question in you can link your same video and it follows that
procedural piece that I spoke of earlier and Jeremy talked about setting up
routines so if you look at this it says watch deeper dig deeper and discussed so
we can do these things and still allow our students access to the tools that
we’ve been using in an organized fashion and this could be my lesson for science
each week now a lot of you are saying okay dr. Grillo there’s no internet so I
support on cooperative school services there’s nine districts and our students
range in ability level and also in kind of living in a metropolitan all the way
to very rural and so I even have the challenge of having some teachers
without working high-speed Internet um so if we’re thinking of rural areas we
can send some of these same directions home with the same activation thinking
strategies and a set of notes or guidelines so that kids are able to
access with high-tech or low-tech um so this is another strategy I shared with
my principals and some of my teens are doing this and so I created a link
directly to the same letter and so for reading an exposure to literacy we
started this I of a story a day Waller away and so I
mentioned some families are supporting kiddos why not have the whole family
experience a story together whether it’s via their iPhone or they’re reading a
paper book or they’re using some means I think what we need to be digging deeper
into is this concept of having kiddos and their families taking a meaningful
story and a break from the corona virus to truly let their social and emotional
well-being and stress kind of fade away and get into a book um I know some
principals are going live in reading books I know that some reading
specialists and different teams and athletes and all sorts of folks are
trying to make sure that literacy is truly accessible because we do realize
that some parents again are not readers or maybe some kiddos are going to be
spending time in other areas and child care arrangements because their families
are part of healthcare worker teams so we’ve got to be thinking pretty creative
but in terms of having students have some sort of access to a story a day and
we’ve given you some really cool things but a personal favorite of mine is a
story on story line called as fast as words fly and so it can teach
us a lot about diversity and making sure that we’re using technology to really
work on the strengths of our kiddos and the young man in that story becomes a
beautiful typist so I wish you’ll go out and check that out as well now when
we’re thinking about teaching the best of the best in special ed focuses on
this idea of flexible teaching we in our and our work know this is Universal
Design for Learning and so no two students are alike so making sure that
you have low tech and no tech options within your teaching routines is truly
important offer choices because we know that a lot of students have a hundred
percent extended time if you’re using strategies but
our choices you’ll have students completing work because it’s not so
painful so if we can give students choices that’s gonna actually lead to
work productivity and we’re gonna be able to get them to accomplish things
with less tears families are really concerned that kiddos are trying to do
work and they’re crying and emotionally going through stress so we have to make
sure those choices include fun items I have a friend that’s allowing their
students to go onto minecraft edu for recess so we’ve got to be building in
those times for breaks for children and not everything has to look like what it
looks like when it’s in your classroom so just kind of keep that in mind we’ve
got to keep the choices fun and also keep them in a way that students will
tackle them we want to make sure that we’re sharing content in multiple
formats so that students can truly access the learning that you’re trying
and if we need to coach our teachers that work with kiddos one-on-one a
little bit too we might need a little bit more general education and special
education collaboration and then think about the extra layer of having someone
at home so we might also need collaboration to increase from special
education to parents to walk them through visual schedules pieces that
coach them and guide them through the different applications of our work and
it truly allows students to create things and shuri and share because
they’re really missing school you know a lot of shit was my day off I hate school
but they’re really missing their friends and they’re missing the normalcy of
everyday here’s a great example from a wonderful colleague that shared an
entire book and you’ll have that book available off of Apple books it’s a free
download for you but we can use this in both high tech and low tech options and
so whatever you’re reading if you do a story a day you might clam the student
think through critically a main character and they might be
oh this character had a theme song or like a rock song
what would their song sound like and this is just a fun creative way to
address characterization and it’s predictable and you can change the
characters throughout your days of learning but keep the strategy the same
now if you know it says you can write about it you can speak about it and then
you can take video and upload it to the class so if you have those multiple
modes of engagement it’s going to increase work completion and also the
fact that it kiddos do not have access to the Internet they can still fill out
this graphic organizer this is the wonderful journal assignment that could
stay consistent through our whole pandemic this is from a university
faculty and there’s more guiding questions and you’ll get a link to this
activity but he has students to developing primary resources so think
about students and their feelings over-over having lived in a panda
they’re having their lives changed immensely so with not being prompts to
write to and kind of journal you know journal writing they might have a really
easy time sharing you like they don’t like staying in all day they don’t like
not playing with their friends you might get more writing because it’s authentic
and it’s honest and it allows them to be creative in a way that they can share
their feelings if you do assignment I would recommend that you meet with your
tittles and you make sure they’re not under
distress we work with a lot of kiddos that have you know social and emotional
needs and although we want to give them treated of ways to handle those needs
I suggest that you work with your related counseling service providers so
that if you have a kiddo on the edge and they’re overly stressed that they can do
a check-in and provide those servicemen it’s now my favorite and all time great
I’ve been for years pushing special education teachers at all levels
to really think about choice boards so choice for
offer a lot of things to us as educators eh they’re easy tools to share up let me
know me be real transparent about that we can share choice words really widely
across many of our domains with many teachers so you’re gonna really if you
develop a set of choice boards I’m gonna challenge you as awesome stewards of
your brother’s keeper sister’s keeper if you all could please share these with at
least three colleagues but do you think they’re gonna use them at this or they
might edit them we’re gonna divide and conquer our work and it’s not gonna feel
so stressful chores choice words also address our learners needs because they
have a choice they’re empowered to make some choices so when you develop choice
boards we want to make sure that they’re truly varied and then we can also
mitigate the technology concerns by offering low tech options so these tools
can be posted for any learner on any management system it could be sent out
via a text message to a parent if you need it to um you could actually send me
than the snail mail if you need it you and I I just I can’t speak enough for
choice words these are some real live examples and so this is for a young man
widely and then that QR code takes them to a technology base board if available
if not that’s okay so the teachers have created these very
specifically for specific kiddos um this is one I use in a class at the
University of Central Florida every year with graduate students that are first
digging in to universal design so my students get the choice and the choices
are given vertically they can do a traditional or low-tech option or they
can choose a students they’ll propose option or they can be a little risky and
trying to modernly high-tech Austin so my my students get a choice and every
single learning module is set up so with the hundred percent student driven but
I’m grading them the same so when you get these
words understand that you don’t want to differentiate if you think that
something is more challenging a student shouldn’t get more points if the deal is
pick three things they get three equal parts of that choice board grade um so
here’s a little graphic when Jimmy and I were collaborating thinking about what
you all should be truly assessing is how in fact are you already using technology
and then if you’re not what technology is easy to monitor easy to progress
monitor and easy to interrupt so these are just a few and I know Jeremy already
touched on a few and I showed you the example ted-ed um there’s a few on here
that I’m not yet spoken about so I found my teachers and two districts exploring
read theory the theory allows you to assign reading and they students can
access this on a phone so they do one costed today after they kind of Lexile
set themselves and you get immediate data based on them answering
comprehension questions so we will ask them things right at their instructional
level what my students to do is to use read theory and a screen reader so that
they’re able to progress to closer to on grade level reading material and so I’m
challenging my teachers to allow students both reading with their eyes
and reading with their ears and so that’s how I’m using read theory over
time if you assign at least three a week it’s been my experience that in roughly
one year’s time students are at the independent level with reading if
they’re truly doing read theory three times a week now that’s not research
that’s from practical standpoint so you know me with the PhD I don’t want to say
oh this is the guarantee but what I am gonna share is that if students are
accessing read theory and they’re truly engaging you’re gonna see their reading
totally skyrocket I promise you that seesaw is the
the tool that my teachers are using and I’m gonna model it for you so here’s the
picture of seesaw and I just registered myself the class and what I love about
sea salt is their activity libraries that already are addressing things for
coab in nineteen i’m gonna demonstrate this one so here is the daily reading
routine notice each one of those numbered items so when we talked about
best practice you’ll have clear instructions that are numbered these
numbers have also a label that you’re able to see some sort of action at the
bottom of this it also has an ability to play back for students and this is free
for anybody to use and you can borrow this lesson for creating your daily
reading routine if there’s something you want to edit on it once you say pull it
into your your class you can go ahead and edit these things teachers are using
this it’s very interactive it’s really easy to use it’s easy on an iPad or a
computer so because it’s so fluid students are able to log in on a phone
so it’s a pretty easy thing for teachers to learn and also students to navigate
all right this one’s just pure old fun so a lot of my art integration
specialists or art therapists or your theme teachers they’re having kind of a
challenge because they do a lot of creative materials maybe they do
creative therapies but they’re climbing a challenge because there’s not as many
out-of-the-box solutions for them so this is a great site it’s called take
kids there’s activities that you can post as is and they take you through
learning art you learn about our history you learn about creativity things and
you can even make art now the only stipulation I share is making sure you
know your students if you’re assigning this to if a student is in poverty and
they’re needing to rely on our free and reduced lunch
this time some of them might not be appropriate but others of them will so
you just make sure that you know your students and who you’re customizing
instruction for but I do have a lot of therapists that are interested in using
this tool um so let’s take a look whoever be doing how do we know when
we’re doing really well then the age-old question every teacher should ask
whether you’re in a brick and mortar building whether you’re in a mixed mode
situation order trying to teach from a distance how will I know when I’m doing
well also when is it time to truly adjust our practices and then what if
I’m not feeling connected so we know that a part of students success the
number one thing that predicts that is the teacher we know that relationships
matter in special education especially but we do not connect with our students
our students aren’t progressing so is that gonna change and if I have to find
help who in this time is going to help me because I’m isolated to my house so
we’re going to talk about ways to get help so here’s a beautiful cat and for
all of you that know me I love love love animals I have far too many cats but we
know that engagement increases when you are personable but you share a part of
yourself when you give your heart and when you make it a person of making
personal connection so making a personal connection usually will get your
students more deeply connected with you the second thing to this is when we are
doing really well in online or distance instruction we’re gonna know because
people are going to be engaged we can take a look at various math metrics
number of logins number of text messages number of parent phone calls number of
completed class assignments or submissions number of discussion posts
on teaching online gives you sensitive data but I like to take it to more
realistic data are your kids responding to you and
are you having interactions that you feel like they are engaged and I would
take it as simple as if you hear crickets nothing from your kiddos for
three or more days you’ve got to engage them so I I kind of give you three
because maybe they’re working in three days cycles and so wherever they are
they might need that three days however if you hear nothing from them in three
days I would give them a personal phone call
now many teachers shared with me today they’re not comfortable calling with
their personal phones so you can set up a Google Voice number and there’s plenty
of tools then I tweeted some out today with that but make sure that you’re
checking in with your kiddos when is this time for an adjustment so
just like in a building with brick and mortars when you feel like your parents
are telling you it’s time it’s probably time if you feel like the lessons are
stagnant or you’re just not getting them turned in it’s time for an adjustment so
typically our parents are special education parents especially they’re
gonna speak up what I’m going to ask for you to do is truly work with your
parents if we are communicating enough with parents from a distance we’re gonna
of an ability to kind of be flexible in time so we don’t have to wait until
somebody is truly complaining right or truly upset
I call it productively advocating so we can we can use feedback and as students
even how is this going gums up thumbs down give me a five if you love this
give me a zero if you hated it give me a three if it’s okay and actually if you
guys are out there in the cyberspace feel free to give me a five if this
webinars going great give me a zero if you hate it or if if you felt like
you’re right on par it’s average taking a look at 40 million this is just a fun
little fact um within the world I know special education teachers are
truly special and they want to be making both can
with our kiddos so what I need you to know is just because you’re not in the
building you’ll be able to make the connection there’s 40 million Americans
participating with online dating and they say that they have found loved via
distance opportunities if people can fall in love online and become married I
know that they can get passionate about your teaching so a little fun fact
Daniel McNulty and I we truly first engaged on a Twitter chat all about
reading instruction and creating access and he’s currently now my husband so if
I can do it I know that you all can do it all right
so fun little fact um staying connected let’s think about how we’re gonna get
support and stay connected so clearly a lot of you are my personal friends
connected to BC connected to e luma therapy so stay connected with us make
sure you’re not in isolation make sure your whole planning with colleagues and
teachers I know that I’m Jeremy shared that you should probably web have a
coffee date coffee shop you know have a web meeting with your colleagues to make
sure that you’re feeling connected to them also involve your students in
creating content because they’re gonna be able to really shape learning um and
make sure that you’re also staying plugged into what your districts are
doing I know amazing amazing leaders we have
the Council for school administrators of special education they’re working
tirelessly with districts to make sure that you all feel supported so make sure
that you’re staying up with your district leaders and if you hit a snag
just stay calm you know make sure that you’re reaching out to folks and also
know there’s a lot of us online so if it’s not working now it’s okay to step
away for 20 minutes and come back and try again
um I I said that’s probably the best piece of advice don’t get frustrated
because you’ll probably not stop it in that time that’s all I have for you guys
hopefully you feel like you’ve learned a little bit and I’m going to turn it over
to the PC readership and thanks Kelly and thanks Jeremy Wow
they say that’s it like you we didn’t have tons and tons of resources shared
I’d like to remind everyone that the recording will be available I’ve gotten
that question a lot in the chat box as well the resources the slides and a link
to a handout those are available currently in the
control panel and they also be available with the recording afterwards we’re
getting close to the end of our time but we do have time for a couple of
questions for those of you who have submitted questions we aren’t able to
get to we encourage you to check with your colleagues to chat with people if
you’re a CEC member in the CEC community to reach out to us as this kovat 19
progresses we obviously are all learning as we go and learning what we might not
know already so knowing what we need to look for is really helpful so here’s one
can we legally provide IEP service minutes during online meetings and that
might be more of a compliance question but do you guys know off the top of your
head either of you yes there’s a this is Jeremy and that dr. gorilla I’m sure
you’ll have a lot to input here as well but yes providing online education does
serve as a compliant form of delivering IEP related minutes just as a case in
point our organization serves 16,000 students across the country in many
different states doing speech therapy occupational therapy mental health
counseling school psychology and assessment services and maybe dr. grill
you can talk a little bit more specifically to the teacher side all
right having a little delay yeah so within our service plans we’re sharing
with teachers to make sure like the resource that Jeremy shared the Google
Forms that you’re tracking your minutes so if in the provision of the IEP it
says that student got–let face 30 minutes of direct instruction for Faunus
we’ve got to be making those minutes happen so if school
is aka in session via e-learning we’ve got to be tracking those so whether it’s
we are sharing materials that parents helped to facilitate or were physically
getting on the phone and singing songs and doing things that would facilitate
those phonics supports if it doesn’t an IEP we have to deliver it so I do know I
have teachers that have been meeting with small groups and also one on one
with kiddos and they have been using some tools to track minutes reading like
the read theory piece or making sure that they’re able to log in and track
those minutes so for every provision in the IEP if it says X number of minutes
in that service period if we move to online we have to track those minutes o
SEP also gave that directive so that we know if schools are in session whether
it’s at a distance or if it’s in the physical building we are providing
services those services might look a little different but they have to be
customized specially designed instruction and we have to be providing
those instructional minutes so yeah yeah I think that’s a perfect point we will
include the Oh set directions but also know that there are a lot there’s a lot
of information coming out very quickly from state offices of Education the O
SEP documentation is a great place to start and I want to remind everyone that
we will provide these resources out to you afterward you won’t be able to click
on the screen here but what we will do is provide the recording and a bunch of
resources that will help you get up and running yeah Jeremy also tweet eval and
then maybe you all can push it on the Illuma site as well we can send a link
right we will for sure priest so that is we have time for just
one more question we’ve gotten a lot of questions in about working with specific
populations of students those who have low incidence disabilities those who may
have visual impairment folks in the preschool pre-k world we are going to at
this time we obviously don’t have enough time to address all of those questions
right now I’m gonna suggest you reach out to our CEC special interest
divisions for those of you looking for information on especially health and
multiple disabilities are complex and chronic condition special interest
division just shared some information on their Facebook page about working with
students at home the CEC division for early childhood is an excellent place to
go her resources and as is the early childhood personnel Center for those of
you working with younger ones and then both of the CEC division on visual
impairment and deafblindness as well as the CEC division on communicative
disabilities I hope I got the new name right are good places to go for folks
working with students who have visual impairments or deaf or hard-of-hearing
so here’s the last one will i’ll post you guys for now working with students
who may not have a lot of technology available Kelly you touched on this very
briefly can you give us some more ideas for working with students who may not
have access to Internet all the time or to cellphones or things like that what
are some suggestions for keeping their learning going well they’re not in a
physical classroom dr. Groll why don’t you go ahead first and I’ll go after you
awesome often so what a lot of my teachers are doing is creating those
menu boards choice boards and sending those home in paper format so that
students can put those things up on the frigerator and cross off the ones that
they do and then they’re going to send back the package so we are seeing some
package kinds of things and I know that online on handful of folks really kind
of slammed that packet resource kind of approach however we’ve got to
differentiate in a waise I’m really really proud of my
occupational therapist they sent home visual schedules with
packages of sensory routines and sensory diets and then they did follow-up phone
calls and kind of went through like all of the items in the bag so I do think
there’s a way to you know make sure that we’re reaching folks without those
pieces of technology I know that on CEC community I shared the use of zoom and
Jeremy also went over that in this because zoom allows you to make a phone
call in verses just that video portion not web call so I think we’ve just got
to be a little creative and think of what are we currently doing and how can
that transcend to the home and so if it’s a specific need if somebody wants
to kind of be on me I will kind of think through it I’m a really good problem
solver but you probably have teams of folks too that are working through these
same questions that’s why we try to address the no internet but I think
those choice boards having the ability to make personal phone calls to to
families I know that we can’t gather physically so what a lot of schools have
done in the past with a regular elearning day if they might actually
meet groups of kids at the local public library right or they that’s where the
kiddos are getting support to do elearning for their internet so because
we don’t have that and those librarians there we have a new challenge so I do
appreciate you all kind of grappling with that question but I think if you
you think of the packages we consent home clear visual schedules because
again reading may be a barrier and the minute we send paper were increasing the
barrier to education so we want to make sure there’s visual supports and then
going over verbally on the phone those visual schedules it’s gonna make a
win-win yes I agree with everything that you
said a few things that I would expand on is with regards to packets if the family
does have the ability to print them at home great if they do not then many
schools are abiding by the CDC’s recommendations to not have gatherings
greater than 10 by having a few people at the school who are printing packets
for pickup much like is being done for the free and reduced lunch situations
and making sure that our students are getting fed so having those packets
printed and for pickup at the school is also an option one thing for sure is
that we do have to be creative and I echo what dr. Grillo has said there
because it is a tough situation that we’re in and it takes all kinds continue
the dialogue keep talking to colleagues and be creative but remember that we are
trying everyone’s trying everyone’s in the same boat we need to do everything
we can to help these kids and provide the specialized instruction all along
reminding that we have to have grace for them and for us in the process on that note and since we’re at 5:07
East Coast time I want to thank Jeremy and Kelly so much for their willingness
to present this webinar for us for their time their expertise I’d like to thank
all of you for joining us live and for all of your commitment to children and
youth with deception a letís everyday and especially during this crazy time

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