The Evolution of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

The Evolution of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning


Indeed I have been involved in the
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning from the beginning. I think it’s fair to say that much like that character in one of Moliere’s plays, I don’t remember if it was Monsieur Jourdain who has this
marvelous discovery that he has been speaking prose all his life and never
knew it. I think a lot of us were engaged in this study of practice and often
practice that involved ourselves, our colleagues, our institution, before we had a name for it. Before Ernie Boyer came up with the Scholarship of Teaching as one of the four scholarships, and before the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
became a term of art force at the Carnegie Foundation and we started the Carnegie Academy for
the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. I think what’s exciting to me about its evolution is
first of all that we can talk about an evolution I mean in most fields not just in the
field of higher education, an awful lot of things start with a lovely flash, the the rocket is launched, and then it
falls to sea with a quiet plop. Especially when the money runs out, and the current iteration that we’ll call, excuse me, the
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, was funded originally by a combination
of the Carnegie Foundation’s own funds and the grant of $5 million dollars from the Pew endowment when Russ
Edgerton had been the program officer of the
endowment and the ancestor of this work was from the
American Association for Higher Ed when Russ was the president, and Pat
Hutchings was director of assessment programs and instruction programs. So, there was this small nucleus which which was captured when we all came together at the Carnegie
Foundation, the place where Boyer had been of course
before I was there. So I guess the first thing that’s pleasing is it
has not just plain disappeared. The other is to see how it has grown and flourished and spread not only across the United States and Canada and across the disciplines we worked hard to make it cross-disciplinary from the very
beginning. But, that quite frankly calling this the International Society at the beginning was more a fantasy than
a description it’s not a fantasy anymore, Peter. I just came back from having
spent a week in Munich at the end of August at the European Association for learning
and Instruction for research and learning instruction
this is a heavy-duty learning science kind of operation from all over Europe. We had sessions
on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. I wasn’t part of one of those sessions, I was part of a
different session. It was a different Shulman,
the Shulman of pedagogical content knowledge and that stuff. I went to sessions on the Scholarship
of Teaching and Learning and people from the Netherlands
and from the UK and Scotland and from Austria and Sweden and and yeah so that’s how it’s about and I can’t predict where it’s going to
go next.

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