The Muckleshoot, with Denise Bill

The Muckleshoot, with Denise Bill


So I have the utmost
admiration for Dr. Denise Bill. Super– this is not the
most formal introduction. But when I think
of Dr. Denise Bill, I think of a wicked,
smart superwoman who does incredible
work for her tribe. We are so pleased to have
her and her crew here today, and those great folks that
I know that she’s brought. So, Dr. Denise Bill. [APPLAUSE] Good morning. Thanks, everybody. I’m really happy
to be here today. And I wanted to read the
contemporary definition of Muckleshoot, and
kind of who we are. We have some emerging
young scholars in their college years. My nephew Justice Bill, Wayne
Buchanan, some of our elders, Colby King George, my
brother, Willard Bill Jr., who’s the culture
director from the tribe. I’ve been working on a new
definition about the treaty rights. And I’ll just read it to you. It’s a little bit different
than what the website says. That definition is probably
going to be changing. So the Muckleshoot
Indian Tribe historically lived throughout the
Green and White River watersheds, and the Cedar
and the Black River. Muckleshoot Indian
Tribe are signers of both the Medicine Creek
and Point Elliott Treaties. Our usual and accustomed
area encompasses King County, including the city of Seattle. The ancestral language
of the Muckleshoot is [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH],, which
has been spoken in this area for over 10,000 years. Today is celebrated as
we are alive and strong as a sovereign nation. And so how it works
with Native tribes– for example, Muckleshoot
Indian Tribe, we are our own government. So we’re our own nation. So those of us
that are enrolled, Muckleshoot tribal
members like myself, and a lot of the
presenters today, we’re have dual citizenship. So we are citizens of the
Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, and we’re citizens of
the US, United States. And so I also wanted to take
a moment to talk about– some of the Muckleshoot
tribal members are in Alcatraz right
now, in San Francisco, to support the AIM Movement,
the American Indian Movement. And those of you
that are scholars can download that and learn
more about the American Indian Movement. But it basically
started in 1968. And it was initially
formed to work on systemic areas of
poverty and police brutality against Native
Americans in the 1960s. So similar to other cultures
starting up organizations to combat different issues
in their communities, so did Native Americans. And some people
have different views on AIM, American
Indian Movement. But it was started to
address police brutality towards Native people,
and also the deep poverty for Native Americans. Today, you guys are
all living in a world where it’s kind of cool
to be native now, right? It’s cool to date
a Native person, to be with Native people,
to go to Native casinos, and all of that. But if you step back
about 40 years ago, like in the city of Auburn,
it wasn’t very cool at all. And, you know, I was a student
in the Auburn School District at the time. And when I was in
fourth grade, I was with my best
friend at the bus stop. And she says, oh, who are you? What’s your ethnicity? And I said, I’m Muckleshoot. And she says, ew! You’re one of those
dirty Indians? And that was my best friend. And that was really hard. And so that night after
school I went and told my mom what she said. And she said to always
be proud of who I was, and of the Muckleshoot
Indian people. And so we’ve come such a far
way and done different things. We’ve done the
fishing in the 70s, with all the fishing
wars and everything. And then now, of course, the
last 20 years, we have such– we’re in a, really,
a time of prosperity right now, because of our
work with the casinos. And the Muckleshoot
Indian Tribe, I would just like to
say, most of our profits go into education. We have the best scholarship
package, probably in the country, for our people. We have put our money
into healthcare, housing, all of these important
things for our people. And cultural, and language. So with that being
said, the first group I want to introduce
you to this morning is the Muckleshoot
Language Department. We’re so honored to
have them here today. So if the Muckleshoot Language
Department would come here. They’re going to sing a few
songs for us, and speak. [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]. Good morning. Eileen Richardson
[NON-ENGLISH SPEECH].. My name is Eileen Richardson. And I’m a Muckleshoot
tribal member. Today, me and my team have
come to sing and share a few songs with you guys. The first thing we
are going to sing, it’s called the “Mount
Rainier Prayer Song.” We, as Muckleshoot people,
Mount Rainier is sacred to us. So we have a prayer song. And that’s what we will
start the day with. [DRUMMING] [NON-ENGLISH SINGING] [APPLAUSE] The next song that
we’re going to sing is called “Rosie’s Song.” It’s called “Rosie’s
Song” because one of our tribal elders, the
woman who wrote this song, her name is Rosie. The words to it
mean, we are joyful. We are from Muckleshoot. And we are strong. [DRUMMING] [NON-ENGLISH SINGING] [APPLAUSE] The last song that
we’re going to share is called “The
Strengthening Song.” The words are
[NON-ENGLISH SPEECH].. That means, “we
speak to each other.” [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]. “We give to each other.” [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]. “We help each other. And [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]. “And in this way, we
strengthen one another.” [DRUMMING] [NON-ENGLISH SINGING] [APPLAUSE] So over at Muckleshoot,
we are very fortunate that our tribal
council supports our language and our culture tremendously. So we have a
decently large staff for a tribal language program. We– not everybody is here
with us today, but we do have– there’s 15 of us. So I’m going to go ahead
and pass the mic down so these guys can introduce
themselves and let you know what they do for our program. I’m the director. I don’t know if I said that. But I was a teacher. [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]. My name is Elizabeth Ocampa. I’m from the Muckleshoot
Indian Tribe. And I am the middle
school language teacher. My name is Mary Ross. I am the admin spec for
the language program. And I’ve been there
for almost 12 years. And what work are
you doing now, Mary? Oh. I also work with my
uncle, Bill [INAUDIBLE],, working on the history
of Muckleshoot. Hello. My name is Elise Bill-Gerrish. This is my daughter, Lily. And Denise Bill up here
is my mom and grandmother. Stephanie Lindgren
[NON-ENGLISH SPEECH].. Hello, everyone. My name is Stephanie Lindgren. I’m from Muckleshoot. And I work as the Head Start
[INAUDIBLE] language teacher. Hi. My name is Lavonna. I work with the– I’m the language teacher for
the second and third year. My name is Shahayla Elkins. And I am the elementary
[INAUDIBLE] coordinator for this institution. And I am Latasha Moses-Gonzalez. I am the language teacher
for the Muckleshoot Child Development Center. [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]
My name is [INAUDIBLE],, [? Morgan ?] [? Zalecki. ?] I do
the Tribal College and culture. OK. So, yeah. As you can see, we have teachers
throughout our community. They teach at our
Muckleshoot Tribal School, kindergarten through
12th grade, there’s languages being taught there,
at our Child Development Center and also at our Early
Learning Center, and if you have to be
[? classical, ?] also. Thank you very much, Eileen and
the whole team for being here. Really appreciate it. [APPLAUSE] OK. So I also wanted
to mention that I’m the Executive Director
of Adult and Higher Education for the
Muckleshoot Indian Tribe. And education, as I
mentioned earlier, is very important to our people. And so currently right now
I oversee the Muckleshoot Scholarship Department,
which– over the last 17 years since the scholarship
program started, over 600 Muckleshoots
have now earned degrees. And we know that’s only been in
this, you know, limited time. [APPLAUSE] And then I oversee the
Muckleshoot Tribal College. And we have some
staff here today from the Muckleshoot
Tribal College. I don’t know if you guys
would stand, or wave. I just want to thank
them for also being here. And then [? Ford ?]
in the back here. And then the Muckleshoot
Tribal College is a partnership-based
college right now. We have many
different institutions that partner with us. We’re working on a
certified nursing assistant program with Renton
Technical College right now. We have a GED High
School 21 program. We have an NT Plus
program, which is a Native American career
technical education program grant offering,
for the first time ever, an AAST degree
in information systems and security, with
Green River College. Green River is one of our
big partners for that. So it’s a free
AAST degree in IT. So we’re really excited. And that’s open to
everyone, not just Muckleshoot tribal members. And then, let’s see, we have
also Northwest Indian College. Is Edna Wyena here this morning? OK. Good. Edna’s going to
come up and just– You can go ahead and come
on up and I’ll introduce you to say a few words. Or actually I’ll bring
you up in a few moments, if you don’t mind. And so if you’re
ever in the area– and Muckleshoot Tribal
College is right– you’ve been, probably, to
the White River Amphitheater. So if you’ve gone to the
White River Amphitheater, you’ve gone just
about a block too far. We’re on the right by
the King County Library. So anyone’s welcome to come to
the Muckleshoot Tribal College. You don’t have to be Native. And we try to do a
good job of offering a variety of programs for
our people and our community. So now I’m really
pleased to introduce our next special guest. And– can you pull
up the article? I want to just
share this article about my niece, Sovereign Bill. Miss Molly of Denali. And I’ll just read a
couple of words of this. Growing up, Sovereign
Bill’s parents didn’t let her watch
Pocahontas or Peter Pan. They wanted her to
learn about her culture through their family
traditions and beliefs, not by watching movies they
believed embraced stereotypes and skewered what it means
to be Native American. Now Bill, otherwise
known as Sovereign, is using her own voice to
make sure Native kids today have real representation on TV. That’s why TODAY
is honoring to her as a Groundbreaker for
International Day of the Girl. The 15-year-old from
Auburn, Washington voices the main character in
the new PBS cartoon, Molly of Denali, which
follows a young Alaska Native girl on
adventures exploring her culture and her community. Bill told TODAY Style that
Native people aren’t often represented in Western
media, and when they are it’s usually misrepresentation. “TV and movies show
stereotypes and the Indian in the headdress. But there are a
lot of differences between Native cultures. A Native tribe in Montana is
different than a Native tribe in Washington,” Bill said. “I think Molly of Denali is
different in a lot of ways,” she added. “One, it’s showcasing
a Native culture and representing
it in a good way. And it shows Alaska as
well, and a lot of people don’t know Alaska.” And so– and then also just,
I think, a few days ago, I received a message
that Sovereign is– maybe you should tell them a
little bit more about this. But she’s been
recognized as one of 18 of the most influential
young women 18 and under. So let’s give a big, warm
welcome to Sovereign Bill. [APPLAUSE] And I’m also going to introduce
Miss Robin Pratt, who’s wonderful in her own right. She’s the Indian Ed Coordinator
for Auburn School District. And so we try– you know,
all of us in the Muckleshoot community, we all consider
ourselves all a family, with those all Native people. So we’ll let you say a
few words, [INAUDIBLE] any words you want to say, and
then we’ll show a few clips. [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] So the first part
of my introduction, I introduced myself
in Tlingit, where– I am Tlingit on my mom’s side. And the second part
of my introduction, I introduced myself in
Lushootseed from my dad’s side. So my name is Sovereign Bill. I voice Molly in Molly
of Denali, a new show. And Muckleshoot [INAUDIBLE]. But yeah. I’m glad to see
everyone here today, and that I’m able to
be here and just talk a little bit about it, I guess. So yeah. I think– I’m very
proud to be in it, and very glad that I’m
able to do this work. And even if I
wasn’t in the show, I would still be so happy
that this is coming out. Because this is really the
representation we need. Because we’re– like,
people say, like, we’re no longer killing Natives. Right? But with this invisibility,
it’s also still putting us down and putting us in the dark. And so this is giving a
light, and good representation that we’ve long been awaiting. See if that makes sense. So, yeah. I’m so happy that
we’ll be able to show a little bit about this, or
about the world of Molly. And yeah. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] I’m Molly– I’m Sovereign’s
mom, and the driver for Molly of Denali. And it really has been
a wonderful journey. I’m Robin Pratt. And– [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]
So, saying, introduction. My Tlingit name is
[NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] and I’m from Alaska, and Tlingit
from the [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] clan. And really this project
has been so phenomenal. And there’s a fair
amount of supporting that takes place on our
part to help make it happen. But it’s well worth it. And I don’t know– how many in here
have already seen an episode of Molly of Denali? Raise your hand. OK. So you’re in for a treat. And I don’t want to take
up too much of the time because this is so phenomenal. But I am a coordinator. Denise Bill actually was my
boss in Auburn School District. And so I kind of
stepped into that role a little while
after she moved on. And we have– in
our school district we work closely with
the Muckleshoot Tribe, and have about 670
Native American students. And 200– about 200
or so are Muckleshoot. And 240 or so are from
Washington tribes, in Auburn School District. I just wanted to share that. Thank you. Poor Robin. I think I’ve been her
boss most of her life. [LAUGHTER] But we like to keep
it all in the family. Right? So Robin is doing great
things in Washington State. And we have a saying in
the Native community. It takes a village. It takes all of us
to work together to do the great
things that we do. So let’s see this clip
without further ado here. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] Hi! I’m Sovereign. And I’m Sequoia. Welcome to the world
of Molly of Denali– No! Stop! –a new show coming to PBS Kids! I play Molly, a feisty
10-year-old Alaskan Native girl. Hey, everyone! It’s me, Molly. Coming to you from way
up high in Mom’s plane. She is gregarious. She’s curious about the world. Such a role model to kids. Have fun! As Alaskan Native people,
as indigenous people, it is incredibly
meaningful for our children to see themselves
represented on the screen. It’s a positive image that
children can feel good about. Being a part of the
first Alaskan Native show makes me feel like I’m
making an important change. Never underestimate
the power of Molly. Kids are going to love Molly. She and her friends go
on lots of adventures. And they use information
to help them. Looks easy enough. OK. I’ll do it. Woo-hoo! You’re the best! Molly of Denali
is groundbreaking, because it’s the first
children’s television program to really focus on
developing informational text knowledge and skills. Informational texts teach us
about the world around us. Woo! Yay! We found it! Alaska is such a
wonderful context for the Molly of
Denali universe. Molly of Denali also
has children interacting with informational
texts, much as Molly and her friends do
within the show. We’re in luck. Your hero has a blog. When WGBH set out to
make this project, they really went about
things in the right way. Which is partnering in a
really deep and meaningful way with the Alaska
Native community. And we said, we wanted
Alaska Native people at every level of production. And that’s happening. Finally! I’m helping create content
that Alaska Native kids can see and be proud of. And it fits within proven
[INAUDIBLE] storytellers. Part of the beauty
of this series is sharing our
Alaskan Native values, in a way that shows how
connected we truly are. The most important thing
I want kids to take away from this show is that Native
culture is still very alive. The stories are
absolutely universal. Oh! That’s it! Well, what’s it? It’s about everyone taking
care of each other– Molly. –and trying to make this
world a better place. Never give up. So get ready for big
adventures and big fun. Molly of Denali. Coming this summer to PBS Kids! Oh, yeah! [END PLAYBACK] [APPLAUSE] [VIDEO PLAYBACK] [MUSIC PLAYING] This episode was made
possible in part by homework, and the T. Rowe Price
public savings plan. Hey, everyone! It’s me! Molly! (SINGING) Molly of Denali. Let’s go! (SINGING) She’s Molly of Denali! Woo! (SINGING) By a plane
or sled or snowshoe– –Kaktovic down to Juneau
always wanting to learn more. Together with her best friend
Tooey always by her side. And Trini! (SINGING) Discovering
the outdoors on adventures day and night. Come along with Molly. Molly. Through fields of fireweed. Come along with Molly. Molly. From tundra to the sea. [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] Let’s go! (SINGING) Molly of Denali. Yeah! (SINGING) She’s Molly of Denali. Come on! Let’s go! Molly of Denali. She’s Molly of Denali. [MUSIC PLAYING] Grandpa’s Drum. Hmm. The poster for our show
turned out pretty well, Tooey. Did you find any headphones? No. But what is this? Ooh! That’s my old pal, Minnie Moose. [MOOSE LAUGHING] I’m Minnie Moose! Sing the Moose Song with me! [MOOSE GROANING] Ah! [LAUGHTER] You look like a zombie! Grr! [LAUGHTER] Ah! Look! A picture. Who are they? Wait a minute. I think I know! Great! Who? No way. Grandpa Nat? Yup. OK. Let’s see what you’ve got. It’s a picture of you. At least I think it’s you. You’re sitting
with a little girl. Oh. That’s me, all right. From a long time ago. How come I’ve never
heard you sing? Oh! You should sing with
us at the show tonight! Um. I’m sorry [NON-NATIVE SPEECH]. I don’t sing anymore. But how can you not sing? Everybody sings! [CHUCKLES] I don’t sing anymore because– [END PLAYBACK] OK. Just because of time we
have to stop right there. But let’s give another
round of applause to Miss Sovereign Bill. [APPLAUSE] You’re left on a cliffhanger. [LAUGHTER] But you– this is online. It does show on PBS, and so you
can check your local listings. It’s also showing
in Canada on CBC. But there are full episodes
loaded on both the PBS Kids website and on the internet. So you can go to YouTube
and Google Molly of Denali. And what’s remarkable about
this particular episode is, he was just about to say
that he doesn’t sing anymore. He lost his songs. And the episode will connect to
the boarding school era, which is something that has
definitely affected our Native communities
in Canada and all across the United States. So I really encourage
you to look that up. Each episode is only
11 minutes long, and– just enjoy it. Thank you, Robin. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] I don’t know if you
can hear me or not. I don’t know if
it’s working or not. I’ll just try to talk
loud for a minute. So the next person
we’re just going to come up and have share
for a couple of minutes. And because we have one
more person to go next. But Miss Edna Wyena from
Northwest Indian College, can you come up and just
share a couple words about Northwest Indian College? Edna Wyena is the site manager
for Northwest Indian College, one of our partner programs
at Muckleshoot Tribal College. [APPLAUSE] Hello? Hi. My name is Edna Wyena. I am from the Yakima
Indian Reservation. I have three daughters,
and I currently work at Northwest Indian
College as a site manager, at the Muckleshoot Indian
Tribal College site. It is a great honor to
be here to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day. I got my Bachelors
and Masters of Arts in Tribal Governments
and Business Management from Northwest Indian College. And I also got my Masters
in Public Administration from University of Washington. And one thing about
Northwest Indian College was I was able to learn about
Native American history, which I knew nothing about. Didn’t know none of my
traditions or nothing. Native American history is so– Hello? Oh, OK. So one thing about
Northwest Indian College was that Native
American Study class. I grew up– my
grandparents raised me. They never taught
me my language, my traditions, nothing. So I started wondering,
why did they not teach me? So when I went to Northwest
Indian College, I realized why. They wanted to protect me. Because I went to
an all-white school. And so– so them not teaching
me my Native language was a way of them protecting
me so I wouldn’t get in trouble with the schools. So Northwest Indian
College is a great college and I am very happy
to work there and work with Denise Bill. I have known Denise
Bill since I was 19. I worked for her. She was my boss. I was a tutor. And then I also was
Robin Pratt’s student. So this whole
connection is wonderful. Thank you, Edna. [APPLAUSE] We’re really proud of Edna, one
of our former students, too. And you know, we each have
a story about maybe why we haven’t spoke the language. But that’s why it’s
so exciting right now to have the Muckleshoot
Indian Tribe Language Department to be with us. And all the tribe’s
beginning to learn to speak our language again. And I know they’ve been
trying to teach me for years. And I’m having a hard time. But I can count to five now. And I’m working on
saying a few words, so– but it’s never too late. That’s the point. And then Edna, you will– you’re a very strong person. Comes from a very strong Native
family in Washington State. Her grandfather’s David Sohappy. That would be a good
person to Google and research for
the fishing rights. So a very strong family. And you can reclaim that
language for you, too, Edna. Just like we’re
all trying to do. So the next person I’m
really proud to get to introduce this morning
is Mitzi Cross-Judge, a Muckleshoot tribal member. And she is the grandma
of Rosalie Fish. And some of you probably
have been hearing about her. And so let’s give a warm
welcome to Mitzi Cross-Judge. [APPLAUSE] Good morning. I appreciate being here
for Indigenous Day. And I just want to
introduce myself. My name is Mitzi Cross-Judge. I’m the Continuing
Education Coordinator for the Muckleshoot Tribe. I’ve been working at the Tribal
College for going on 15 years. I’ve worked for the
tribe for 30 years. And I’ve lived in
Muckleshoot all my life. The young lady you’re going
to be seeing this morning is my granddaughter. Her name is Rosalie Fish. She’s a Cowlitz member and
has been raised all her life on the Muckleshoot reservation. Rosalie started off last year. She is a track star. And she went and
raced in Spokane. And she raced in the
400-meter and she raced for– she’s racing for a cause for
missing and murdered indigenous women. Her platform was
widely recognized throughout the state, and
throughout the country, as she raced with a handprint– a red handprint across her
mouth and MMIW down her leg. The red handprint
across her mouth is like silencing the
women, the Native women, that we have in our families
that are missing and murdered. She ran the 400 meter,
and she won first place for Mary Anne Upham, who
was missing in Auburn and passed away. A championship for Alice
Looney in the 1600-meter. She won first place. A championship for Jacqueline
Salyers in the 800-meter. And a championship for our own
Muckleshoot member Renee Davis and Davis’s unborn child,
who died on the Muckleshoot reservation, for
the 3,200-meter. Each were the indigenous
women from Washington who met a violent death. And each were
honored on a poster that Fish brought
to the state meet. And I’ll let you– And here’s Rosie. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] My name is Rosalie Fish and
I’m from the Muckleshoot reservation. I ran the 3,200 meters, the
1600 meters, the 800 meters, and sometimes the 400 meter. And I ran at Muckleshoot
Tribal School. When I saw a Lakota runner
named Jordan Marie Daniels, she ran in the Boston
Marathon with a red handprint. And that was really
powerful to me, to see another female Native
runner using her platform. And I decided that I needed
to raise the bar for myself. I qualified for state
championships on May 25th. I ran with the red
handprint over my mouth to represent the
Native women that have been sentenced to violence. And I ran with MMIW
down my right leg. That is the acronym for Missing
and Murdered Indigenous Women. I won a gold medal in all
three of those events, and I won a silver in 400. For me, running is where I can
use my voice the strongest. It’s also something
that uplifts me. And now I’ve found
that I can use my sport to uplift other people as well. I do plan to continue running
for missing and murdered indigenous women,
and for running for all Native
communities, to help raise the voices of
indigenous people. [END PLAYBACK] [VIDEO PLAYBACK] This segment is brought
to you by Verizon. [MUSIC PLAYING] The red is the color
of the MMIW movement. And the handprint is
to represent the women, and specifically
the Native women, that have been silenced
through violence. [MUSIC PLAYING] She has given a voice to
those who have been silenced. [MUSIC PLAYING] To me, running empowers me. And it gives me a platform where
I can speak and use my voice. 2:23, 2:24, 2:25. Missing and murdered
indigenous women is an epidemic that
you can’t really ignore when it’s
happening to your family, and your community. And to me when I realized that
I could use the state track meet as an opportunity to
present this issue, it was something that
I knew I needed to do. [MUSIC PLAYING] Only my mother and my coach
knew about my exact plans. Because I knew that some people
might tell me to keep politics out of sports. Being Native American
and representing missing and murdered indigenous
women and bringing awareness to the epidemic isn’t a
political statement, but rather just an aspect of my
humanity and my identity. And I didn’t want that to be
interfered with in any way. [MUSIC PLAYING] Boston Marathon runner
Jordan Marie Daniels is a Lakota tribal member. And she ran at the
Boston Marathon with red paint over her
mouth, and MMIW down her leg. And when I saw that
I was inspired. She told me that it was going
to be very painful to run. And she was right. It was very, in a way,
sometimes traumatic to just– to think of the
stories of these women. And she told me that
I needed to pray. We need to show up. We need to be persistent. We need to keep
talking about this. [MUSIC PLAYING] On the Yakima reservation,
already there was 13– about 13 missing women,
indigenous women. And then for my
sister to go missing, and it left our
family– where is she? And we looked on the
sides of the roads. We looked everywhere. And just were dumbfounded
as to, where is she? She’s just disappeared. [MUSIC PLAYING] I read some news. And I just started
shaking and trembling. Because it said the body
was there for a long time. And I called Mary. And she called
the tribal police. She called me back next
day and said it was her. And I just broke down, because– 14 months, I was looking
for her every day. Not knowing if she was hungry,
being abused in any way. But I was grateful that
we got her– got her back. Our prayers were answered. We was glad we found her,
but we wanted to know, well, what are you guys doing
to find the answers? How did she get out there? And was there any foul play? And they couldn’t
answer it for us. [MUSIC PLAYING] [END PLAYBACK] All right. Thank you, Mitzi
Cross-Judge for being here. Grandma of Rosalie Fish. We just want to thank all
of you for being here. We know people have to leave for
class and everything like that. But this year, we
chose to represent– we didn’t even say the
other person’s name today. Someone that was a rapist
and murderer, and that today was named after. As Native people, we
have reclaimed this day. It’s now Indigenous
Peoples’ Day to honor all the indigenous people
that have survived despite men that have tried to hurt women. So thank you all for
being here today. [APPLAUSE]

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